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[277e] are merely dancing about you and performing their sportive gambols with a view to your subsequent initiation. You must now, accordingly, suppose you are listening to the first part of the professorial mysteries. First of all, as Prodicus says, you have to learn about the correct use of words—the very point that our two visitors are making plain to you, namely, that you were unaware that learning is the name which people apply on the one hand to the case of a man who, having originally no knowledge about some matter, in course of time receives such knowledge;

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  • Commentary references to this page (2):
    • J. Adam, A. M. Adam, Commentary on Plato, Protagoras, CHAPTER V
    • J. Adam, A. M. Adam, Commentary on Plato, Protagoras, CHAPTER XXIII
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, The Article
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, The Attic Orators from Antiphon to Isaeos, Antiphon: Style
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (2):
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