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[328c] he goes to a temple, states on oath the value he sets on what he has learnt, and disburses that amount. So now, Socrates, I have shown you by both fable and argument that virtue is teachable and is so deemed by the Athenians, and that it is no wonder that bad sons are born of good fathers and good of bad, since even the sons of Polycleitus, companions of Paralus and Xanthippus here, are not to be compared with their father, and the same is the case in other craftsmen's families. As for these two, it is not fair to make this complaint of them yet;


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hide References (7 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (5):
    • James A. Towle, Commentary on Plato: Protagoras, 311c
    • James A. Towle, Commentary on Plato: Protagoras, 314b
    • James A. Towle, Commentary on Plato: Protagoras, 319e
    • James A. Towle, Commentary on Plato: Protagoras, 322c
    • James A. Towle, Commentary on Plato: Protagoras, 323c
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (2):
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