previous next
102.

The Lacedaemonians meanwhile finding the war against the rebels in Ithome likely to last, invoked the aid of their allies, and especially of the Athenians, who came in some force under the command of Cimon. [2] The reason for this pressing summons lay in their reputed skill in siege operations; a long siege had taught the Lacedaemonians their own deficiency in this art, else they would have taken the place by assault. [3] The first open quarrel between the Lacedaemonians and Athenians arose out of this expedition. The Lacedaemonians, when assault failed to take the place, apprehensive of the enterprising and revolutionary character of the Athenians, and further looking upon them as of alien extraction, began to fear that if they remained, they might be tempted by the besieged in Ithome to attempt some political changes. They accordingly dismissed them alone of the allies, without declaring their suspicions, but merely saying that they had now no need of them. [4] But the Athenians, aware that their dismissal did not proceed from the more honorable reason of the two, but from suspicions which had been conceived, went away deeply offended, and conscious of having done nothing to merit such treatment from the Lacedaemonians; and the instant that they returned home they broke off the alliance which had been made against the Mede, and allied themselves with Sparta's enemy Argos; each of the contracting parties taking the same oaths and making the same alliance with the Thessalians.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Notes (Charles D. Morris)
load focus Notes (E.C. Marchant)
load focus English (Benjamin Jowett, 1881)
load focus English (Thomas Hobbes, 1843)
load focus Greek (1942)
hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Sort places alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a place to search for it in this document.
Ithome (Greece) (2)
Mede (Italy) (1)
Argos (Greece) (1)

Visualize the most frequently mentioned Pleiades ancient places in this text.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide References (31 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (12):
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 5.63
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 6.80
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 7.148
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 7.151
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 9.70
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.97
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER LIV
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.42
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.44
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.79
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.107
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.18
  • Cross-references to this page (5):
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.2
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.pos=2.2
    • Harper's, Gythium
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), EXE´RCITUS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), GYTHIUM
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (5):
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (9):
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: