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59.

After the second invasion of the Peloponnesians a change came over the spirit of the Athenians. Their land had now been twice laid waste; and war and pestilence at once pressed heavy upon them. [2] They began to find fault with Pericles, as the author of the war and the cause of all their misfortunes, and became eager to come to terms with Lacedaemon, and actually sent ambassadors thither, who did not however succeed in their mission. Their despair was now complete and all vented itself upon Pericles. [3] When he saw them exasperated at the present turn of affairs and acting exactly as he had anticipated, he called an assembly, being (it must be remembered) still general, with the double object of restoring confidence and of leading them from these angry feelings to a calmer and more hopeful state of mind. He accordingly came forward and spoke as follows:

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hide References (32 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (14):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus, 267
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 2, 2.22
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 2, 2.60
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 2, 2.87
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.10
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 6, 6.31
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 7, 7.4
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 7, 7.68
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER CVI
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER CXIV
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER CXVIII
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XXI
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XXII
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.30
  • Cross-references to this page (6):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, ADJECTIVES
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE CASES
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.1
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.2
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 3.5.3
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter VI
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
    • Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War, Thuc. 4.21
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (11):
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