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109.

The next day Menedaius, who on the death of Eurylochus and Macarius had succeeded to the sole command, being at a loss after so signal a defeat how to stay and sustain a siege, cut off as he was by land and by the Athenian fleet by sea, and equally so how to retreat in safety, opened a parley with Demosthenes and the Acarnanian generals for a truce and permission to retreat, and at the same time for the recovery of the dead. [2] The dead they gave back to him, and setting up a trophy took up their own also to the number of about three hundred. The retreat demanded they refused publicly to the army; but permission to depart without delay was secretly granted to the Mantineans and to Menedaius and the other commanders and principal men of the Peloponnesians by Demosthenes and his Acarnanian colleagues; who desired to strip the Ambraciots and the mercenary host of foreigners of their supporters; and, above all, to discredit the Lacedaemonians and Peloponnesians with the Hellenes in those parts, as traitors and selfseekers. [3]

While the enemy was taking up his dead and hastily burying them as he could, and those who obtained permission were secretly planning their retreat,

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  • Commentary references to this page (20):
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 5.72
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.24
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.100
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.111
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.113
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.114
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.20
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.21
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.24
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.52
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.63
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.92
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.96
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.25
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.32
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER CXIV
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XVII
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XXII
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XXXVIII
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER LX
  • Cross-references to this page (6):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, PREPOSITIONS
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.4.2
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.pos=2.1
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), EXE´RCITUS
    • Smith's Bio, Eury'lochus
    • Smith's Bio, Maca'rius
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (13):
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