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About the same time the Argives invaded the territory of Phlius and lost eighty men cut off in an ambush by the Phliasians and Argive exiles. [2] Meanwhile the Athenians at Pylos took so much plunder from the Lacedaemonians that the latter, although they still refrained from breaking off the treaty and going to war with Athens, yet proclaimed that any of their people that chose might plunder the Athenians. [3] The Corinthians also commenced hostilities with the Athenians for private quarrels of their own; but the rest of the Peloponnesians stayed quiet. [4] Meanwhile the Melians attacked by night and took the part of the Athenian lines over against the market, and killed some of the men, and brought in corn and all else that they could find useful to them, and so returned and kept quiet, while the Athenians took measures to keep better guard in future.

Summer was now over.

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hide References (9 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (3):
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 2, 2.2
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 6, 6.4
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XXXVII
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), SYLAE
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