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Besides, Nestor's account of the war between the Pylians and Eleians, which he relates to Patroclus, agrees with our arguments, if any one examines the lines. For he says there, that Hercules laid waste Pylus, and that all the youth were exterminated; that out of twelve sons of Neleus, lie himself alone survived, and was a very young man, and that the Epeii, despising Neleus on account of his old age and destitute state, treated the Pylians with haughtiness and insult. Nestor therefore, in order to avenge this wrong, collected as large a body of his people as he was able, made an inroad into Eleia, and carried away a large quantity of booty;

“ Fifty herds of oxen, as many flocks of sheep,
As many herds of swine,1

Il xi. 677.
and as many flocks of goats, an hundred and fifty brood mares, bay-coloured, most of which had foals, and ‘these,’ he says,

“ We drove away to Pylus, belonging to Neleus,
By night towards the city;2

Il. xi. 681.
so that the capture of the booty, and the flight of those who came to the assistance of people who were robbed, happened in the day-time, when, he says, he slew Itamon; and they returned by night, so that they arrived by night at the city. When they were engaged in dividing the booty, and in sacrificing, the Epeii, having assembled in multitudes, on the third day marched against them with an army of horse and foot, and encamped about Thryum, which is situated on the Alpheius. The Pylians were no sooner informed of this than they immediately set out to the relief of this place, and having passed the night on the river Minyeius near Arene, thence arrive at the Alpheius at noon. After sacrificing to the gods, and passing the night on the banks of the river, they immediately, in the morning, engaged in battle. The rout of the enemy was complete, and they did not desist from the pursuit and slaughter, till they came to Buprasium, “‘and the Olenian rock, where is a tumulus of Alesius, whence again Minerva repulsed the multitudes;’3” and adds below, “ but the Achæi
Turned back their swift horses from Buprasium to Pylus.

1 Il xi. 677.

2 Il. xi. 681.

3 Il. xi. 756.

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