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CHAPTER XI. CURE OF SATYRIASIS.

INFLAMMATION of the nerves in the genital organs occasions erection of the member with desire and pain in re venerea: there arise spasmodic strainings which at no time abate, since the calamity is not soothed by the coition. They also become maddened in understanding, at first as regards shamelessness in the open performance of the act; for the inability to refrain renders them impudent; but afterwards . . . . . . . . when they have recovered, their understanding becomes quite settled.

For all these causes, we must open the vein at the elbow, and also the one at the ankle, and abstract blood in large quantity and frequently, for now it is not unseasonable to induce deliquium animi, so as to bring on torpor of the understanding and remission of the inflammation, and also mitigation of the heat about the member; for it is much blood which strongly enkindles the heat and audacity; it is the pabulum of the inflammation, and the fuel of the disorder of the understanding, and of the confusion. The whole body is to be purged with the medicine, the hiera; for the patients not only require purging, but also a gentle medication, both

which objects are accomplished by the hiera. The genital organs, the loins, the perineum and the testicles, are to be wrapped in unwashed wool; but the wool must be moistened with rose-oil and wine, and the parts bathed, so much the more that no heating may be produced by the wool, but that the innate heat may be mitigated by the cooling powers of the fluids. Cataplasms of a like kind are to be applied; bread with the juice of plantain, strychnos,1 endive, the leaves of the poppy, and the other narcotics and refrigerants. Also the genital organs, perineum, and ischiatic region, are to be rubbed with similar things, such as cicuta with water, or wine, or vinegar; mandragora, and acacia; and sponges are to be used instead of wool. In the interval we are to open the bowels with a decoction of mallows, oil, and honey. But everything acrid . . . . . . Cupping-instruments are to be fixed to the ischiatic region, or the abdomen; leeches also are very good for attracting blood from the inner parts, and to their bites a a cataplasm made of crumbs of bread with marsh-mallows. Then the patient is to have a sitz bath medicated with worm-wood, and the decoction of sage, and of flea-bane. But when the affection is protracted for a considerable time without any corresponding intermission, there is danger of a convulsion (for in this affection the patients are liable to convulsions), we must change the system of treatment to calefacients, there is need of oil of must or of Sicyonian oil instead of oil of roses, along with clean wool and warming cataplasms, for such treatment then soothes the inflammations of the nerves,--and we must also give castor with honeyed-water in a draught. Food containing little nourishment, in a cold state, in small quantity, and such as is farinaceous; mostly pot-herbs, the mallow, the blite, the lettuce, boiled gourd, boiled cucumber,

ripe pompion. Wine and fleshes to be used sparingly until convalescence have made considerable progress; for wine imparts warmth to the nerves, soothes the soul, recalls pleasure, engenders semen, and provokes to venery.

Thus far have I written respecting the cures of acute diseases. One must also be fertile in expedients, and not require to apply his mind entirely to the writings of others. Acute diseases are thus treated of, so that you may avail yourself of what has been written of them, in their order, either singly or all together.

1 Doubtful whether he means the Solanum nigrum or Physalis somnifera. See Paulus Ægineta, t. iii. p. 359.

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