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TO RUFUS THE FETID.

Wonder not blatantly why no woman shall ever be willing
(Rufus!) her tender thigh under thyself to bestow,
Not an thou tempt her full by bribes of the rarest garments,
Or by the dear delights gems the pellucidest deal.
Harms thee an ugly tale wherein of thee is recorded
Horrible stench of the goat under thine arm-pits be lodged.
All are in dread thereof; nor wonder this, for 'tis evil
Beastie, nor damsel fair ever thereto shall succumb.
So do thou either kill that cruel pest o' their noses,
Or at their reason of flight blatantly wondering cease.

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load focus Notes (E. T. Merrill, 1893)
load focus Latin (E. T. Merrill)
load focus English (Leonard C. Smithers, 1894)
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hide References (12 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (8):
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 2
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 22
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 23
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 37
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 48
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 66
    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 71
    • Charles Simmons, The Metamorphoses of Ovid, Books XIII and XIV, 13.17
  • Cross-references to this page (3):
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