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[60]

Come, however, what was the examination; and how was it conducted? Holloa, you Rufio, (that name will do as well as another,) take care you tell the truth. Did Clodius lay a plot against Milo? “He did.” He is sure to be crucified for saying so. “Certainly.” He has hopes of obtaining his liberty. What can be more certain than this mode of examination? The men are suddenly carried out to be examined; they are separated from all the rest and put into cells that no one may be able to speak to them. Then, when they have been kept a hundred days in the power of the prosecutor, they are produced as witnesses by the prosecutor himself. What can be imagined more upright than this sort of examination? What can be more free from all suspicion of corruption?


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load focus Notes (J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge)
load focus Latin (Albert Clark, Albert Curtis Clark, 1918)
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    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), ARCA
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