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[98]

Caesar too, I suppose, made the law about the exiles which you have posted up. I do not wish to press upon any one in misfortune; I only complain, in the first place, that the return of those men has had discredit thrown upon it, whose cause Caesar judged to be different from that of the rest; and in the second place, I do not know why you do not mete out the same measure to all. For there can not be more than three or four left. Why do not they who are in similar misfortune enjoy a similar degree of your mercy? Why do you treat them as you treated your uncle? about whom you refused to pass a law when you were passing one about all the rest; and whom at the same time you encouraged to stand for the censorship, and instigated him to a canvass, which excited the ridicule and the complaint of every one.

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load focus Latin (Albert Clark, Albert Curtis Clark, 1918)
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  • Cross-references to this page (2):
    • Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar for Schools and Colleges, PRONOUNS
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), LEX
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