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Enter PLESIDIPPUS and TRACHALIO, at the further end of the stage.

PLESIDIPPUS
Tell me all these things over again my life, my Trachalio, my freed-man, my patron, aye rather, my father; has Palæstra found her father and mother?

TRACHALIO
She has found them.

PLESIDIPPUS
And is she my countrywoman?

TRACHALIO
So I think.

PLESIDIPPUS
And is she to marry me?

TRACHALIO
So I suspect.

PLESIDIPPUS
Prithee, do you reckon that he will betroth her to me?

TRACHALIO
So I reckon1.

PLESIDIPPUS
Well, shall I congratulate her father too upon his finding her?

TRACHALIO
So I reckon.

PLESIDIPPUS
Well, her mother too?

TRACHALIO
So I reckon.

PLESIDIPPUS
What then do you reckon?

TRACHALIO
What you ask me, I reckon.

PLESIDIPPUS
Tell me then how much do you reckon it at?

TRACHALIO
What I, I reckon----

PLESIDIPPUS
Then really, do carry over2. Don't be always making a reckoning.

TRACHALIO
So I reckon.

PLESIDIPPUS
What if I run? Pretends to run.

TRACHALIO
So I reckon.

PLESIDIPPUS
Or rather gently, this way? He walks slowly.

TRACHALIO
So I reckon.

PLESIDIPPUS
Ought I to salute her as well when I arrive?

TRACHALIO
So I reckon.

PLESIDIPPUS
Her father too?

TRACHALIO
So I reckon.

PLESIDIPPUS
After that, her mother?

TRACHALIO
So I reckon.

PLESIDIPPUS
And what after that? When I arrive, should I also embrace her father?

TRACHALIO
So I don't reckon.

PLESIDIPPUS
Well, her mother?

TRACHALIO
So I don't reckon.

PLESIDIPPUS
Well, her own self?

TRACHALIO
So I don't reckon.

PLESIDIPPUS
Confusion, he has closed his reckoning3; now when I wish him, he doesn't reckon.

TRACHALIO
You are not in your senses; follow me.

PLESIDIPPUS
Conduct me, my patron, where you please. They go into the cottage of DÆMONES.

1 So I reckon: For the sake of mere nonsense, Trachalio begins to trifle with his master, by giving him the answer of "censeo" to everything he says; just as he gave his repeated answers of "licet" to Dæmones before leaving

2 Do carry over: "At sume quidem," though not given by Fleckeisen, has been here adopted as the reading. "Censeo" seems to mean "to reckon up," as well as "to think." Salmasius and Gronovius suggest, and with fair reason, that he means jocularly to say, "Don't be always reckoning, but cast up and carry over."

3 Closed his reckoning: "Dilectum dimisit." This expression is explained by some Commentators as alluding to the enlisting of soldiers, to which the word "censeo" was applicable. The play on the word "censeo" throughout this Scene is enwrapt in great obscurity.

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