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Enter DEMIPHO and NAUSISTRATA, from the house of CHREMES.

DEMIPHO
Come now, Nausistrata, after your usual way, manage to keep her in good-humor with us, and make her do of her own accord what must be done.

NAUSISTRATA
I will.

DEMIPHO
You are now seconding me with your endeavors, just as you assisted me with your money1 before.

NAUSISTRATA
I wish to do so; and yet, i' faith, through the fault of my husband, I am less able than I ought to be.

DEMIPHO
Why so?

NAUSISTRATA
Because, i' faith, he takes such indifferent care of the property that was so industriously acquired by my father; for from those farms he used regularly to receive two talents of silver yearly; there's an instance, how superior one man is to another.

DEMIPHO
Two talents, pray?

NAUSISTRATA
Aye, and when things were much worse, two talents even.

DEMIPHO
Whew!

NAUSISTRATA
What! does this seem surprising?

DEMIPHO
Of course it does.

NAUSISTRATA
I wish I had been born a man; Id have shown----

DEMIPHO
That I'm quite sure of.

NAUSISTRATA
In what way----

DEMIPHO
Forbear, pray, that you may be able to do battle with her; lest she, being a young woman, may be more than a match for you.

NAUSISTRATA
I'll do as you bid me; but I see my husband coming out of your house. Enter CHREMES, hastily, from DEMIPHO'S house.

CHREMES
Ha! Demipho, has the money been paid him yet?

DEMIPHO
I took care immediately.

CHREMES
I wish it hadn't been paid him. On seeing NAUSISTRATA, aside. : Halloo, I espy my wife; I had almost said more than I ought.

DEMIPHO
Why do you wish I hadn't, Chremes?

CHREMES
It's all right.

DEMIPHO
What say you? Have you been letting her know why we are going to bring her? pointing to NAUSISTRATA.

CHREMES
I've arranged it.

DEMIPHO
Pray, what does she say?

CHREMES
She can't be got to leave.

DEMIPHO
Why can't she?

CHREMES
Because they are fond of one another.

DEMIPHO
What's that to us?

CHREMES
apart, to DEMIPHO. A great deal; besides that, I've found out that she is related to us.

DEMIPHO
apart. What! You are mad, surely.

CHREMES
apart. So you will find; I don't speak at random; I've recovered my recollection.

DEMIPHO
apart. Are you quite in your senses?

CHREMES
apart. Nay, prithee, do take care not to injure your kinswoman.

DEMIPHO
apart. She is not.

CHREMES
apart. Don't deny it; her father went by another name; that was the cause of your mistake.

DEMIPHO
apart. Did she not know who was her father?

CHREMES
apart. She did.

DEMIPHO
apart. Why did she call him by another name?

CHREMES
apart, frowning. Will you never yield to me, nor understand what I mean?

DEMIPHO
apart. If you don't tell me of any thing----

CHREMES
impatiently. Do you persist?

NAUSISTRATA
I wonder what all this can be.

DEMIPHO
For my part, upon my faith, I don't know.

CHREMES
whispering to him. Would you like to know? Then, so may Jupiter preserve me, not a person is there more nearly related to her than are you and I.

DEMIPHO
starting. Ye Gods, by our trust in you! let's away to her; I wish for all of us, one way or other, to be sure about this going .

CHREMES
stopping him. Ah!

DEMIPHO
What's the matter?

CHREMES
That you should put so little confidence in me!

DEMIPHO
Do you wish me to believe you? Do you wish me to consider this as quite certain? Very well, be it so. Well, what's to be done with our friend's2 daughter?

CHREMES
She'll do well enough.

DEMIPHO
Are we to drop her, then?

CHREMES
Why not?

DEMIPHO
The other one to stop?

CHREMES
Just so.

DEMIPHO
You may go then, Nausistrata.

NAUSISTRATA
I' faith, I think it better for all that she should remain here as it is, than as you first intended; for she seemed to me a very genteel person when I saw her. Goes into her house.

DEMIPHO
What is the meaning of all this?

CHREMES
looking at the door of his house. Has she shut the door yet?

DEMIPHO
Now she has.

CHREMES
O Jupiter! the Gods do befriend us; I have found that it is my daughter married to your son.

DEMIPHO
Ha! How can that possibly be?

CHREMES
This spot is not exactly suited for me to tell it you.

DEMIPHO
Well then, step in-doors.

CHREMES
Hark, you, I don't wish our sons even to come to know of this. They go into DEMIPHO'S house.

1 With your money: Colman observes: "Alluding to the money borrowed of her to pay Phormio; and as Donatus observes in another place, it is admirably contrived, in order to bring about a humorous catastrophe that Chremes should make use of his wife's money on this occasion.'

2 Our friend's: Chremes himself is so called, to deceive Nausistrata.

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