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The Old Lion

Whoever, to his honor's cost,
His pristine dignity has lost,
Is the fool's jest and coward's scorn,
When once deserted and forlorn.
With years enfeebled and decay'd,
A Lion gasping hard was laid:
Then came, with furious tusk, a boar,
To vindicate his wrongs of yore:
The hull was next in hostile spite,
With goring horn his foe to smite:
At length the ass himself, secure
That now impunity was sure,
His blow too insolently deals,
And kicks his forehead with his heel.
Then thus the Lion, as he died:
"'Twas hard to bear the brave," he cried;
But to be trampled on by thee
Is Nature's last indignity;
And thou, 0 despicable thing,
Giv'st death at least a double sting."

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    • E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus, 65
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