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He rode a very remarkable horse, with feet almost like those of a man, the hoofs being divided in such a manner as to have some resemblance to toes. This horse he had bred himself, and the soothsayers having interpreted these circumstances into an omen that its owner would be master of the world, he brought him up with particular care, and broke him in himself, as the horse would suffer no one else to mount him. A statue of this horse was afterwards erected by Caesar's order before the temple of Venus Genitrix.

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hide References (9 total)
  • Cross-references to this page (3):
    • Harper's, Roma
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), ROMA
    • Smith's Bio, Ge'nitrix
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (6):
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