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He afterwards appeared at the celebrarion of all public games in Greece: for such as fell in different years, he brought within the compass of one, and some he ordered to be celebrated a second time in the same year. At Olympia, likewise, contrary to custom, he appointed a public performance of music: and that he might meet with no interruption in this employment, when he was informed by his freedman Helius, that affairs at Rome required his presence, he wrote to him in these words: "Though now all your hopes and wishes are for my speedy return, yet you ought rather to advise and hope that I may come back with a character worthy of Nero. During the time of his musical performance, nobody w s allowed to stir out of the theatre upon any account, hoever necessary; insomuch, that it is said some wome with child were delivered there. Many of the spectator being quite wearied with hearing and applauding hir, because the town gates were shut, slipped privately over . the walls; or counterfeiting themselves dead, were ca ried out for their funeral. With what extreme anxiety h engaged in these contests, with what keen desire to be r away the prize, and with how much awe of the judges, s scarcely to be believed. As if his adversaries had been on a level with himself he would watch them narrowly, defame them privately, and sometimes, upon meeting them, rail at them in very scurrilous language; or bribe them, if they were better performers than himself, He always addressed the judges with the most profound reverence before he began, telling them, " he had done all things that were necessary, by way of preparation, but that the issue of the approaching trial was in the hand of fortune; and that they, as wise and skilful men, ought to exclude from their judgment things merely accidental." Upon their encouraging him to have a good heart, he went off with more assurance, but not entirely free from anxiety; interpreting the silence and modesty of some of them into sourness and ill-nature, and saying that he was suspicious of them.

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