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CHAP. 48.—THE MODE IN WHICH TREES BEAR.

Some among the fruit-trees1 bear on both the sides of the branches and the summit, the pear, for instance, the fig-tree, and the myrtle. In other respects the trees are pretty nearly of a similar nature to the cereals, for in them we find the ear growing from the summit, while in the leguminous varieties the pod grows from the sides. The palm, as we have already2 stated, is the only one that has fruit hanging down in bunches enclosed in capsules.

1 This statement, which is drawn from Theophrastus, is rather fanciful than rigorously true.

2 B. xiii. c. 7.

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