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CHAP. 55.—THE SWEET APPLES CALLED MELIMELA: SIX OBSERVATIONS UPON THEM. SOUR APPLES: FOUR OBSERVATIONS UPON THEM.

The apples known as "melimela,"1 and the other sweet apples, relax the stomach and bowels, but are productive of heat and thirst,2 though they do not act injuriously upon the nervous system. The orbiculata3 arrest diarrhœa and vomiting, and act as a diuretic. Wild apples resemble the sour apples of spring, and act astringently upon the bowels: indeed, for this purpose they should always be used before they are ripe.

1 "Honey apples." See B. xv. c. 15, where this apple is also called the "musteum."

2 A purgative sirop of apples, causing thirst, was made by the ancients, the receipt for which was attributed to King Sapor.

3 Or "round" apples. See B. xv. c. 15.

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