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CHAP. 11.—THE TRICHOMANES: FIVE REMEDIES.

The trichomanes1 is a plant that resembles the adiantum,2 except that it is more slender and of a darker colour; the leaves of it, which are similar to those of the lentil, lie close together, on opposite sides, and have a bitter taste. A decoction of this plant, taken in white wine, with the addition of wild cummin, is curative of strangury. Bruised and applied to the head, it prevents the hair from falling off, and, where it has come off, restores it: pounded and applied with oil, it effects the cure of alopecy. The mere taste of it is provocative of sneezing.

1 The same plant as the Callitrichos of B. xxv. c. 86.

2 See B. xxii. c. 30.

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