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Whilst these causes kept Fabius from moving, Sempronius was invested, and the siege works were now actually in operation. [2] A huge wooden tower on wheels had been brought up against the walls and the Roman consul constructed another still higher upon the wall itself, which was fairly high and which served as a platform, after he had placed stout beams across. [3] The besieged garrison protected the walls of the city by hurling stones and sharpened stakes and other missiles from their tower; [4] at last when they saw the other tower brought up to the walls they flung blazing brands over it and caused a large fire. [5] Terrified by the conflagration the crowd of soldiers in it flung themselves down and at the same moment a sortie was made from two of the gates, the outposts of the enemy were [6??] overpowered and driven in flight to their camp, so that for that day the Carthaginians were more like a besieged than a besieging force. [7] As many as 1300 Carthaginians were killed and 59 taken prisoners who had been surprised while standing careless and unconcerned round the walls or at the outposts, and least of all fearing a sortie. [8] Before the enemy had time to recover from their panic Gracchus gave the signal to retire and withdrew with his men inside the walls. [9] The following day, Hannibal, expecting that the consul, elated with his success, would be prepared to fight a regular battle, formed his line on the ground between his camp and the city; [10] when, however, he saw that not a single man moved from his usual post of defence and that no risks were being taken through rash confidence, he returned to Tifata without accomplishing anything. [11] Just at the time when the siege of Cumae was raised Ti. Sempronius, surnamed "Longus," fought a successful action with the Carthaginian Hanno at Grumentum in Lucania. Over 2000 were killed, 280 men and 41 military standards were captured. Driven out of Lucania, Hanno retreated to Bruttium. [12] Amongst the Hirpini, also, three towns which had revolted from Rome, Vercellium, Vescellium, and Sicilinum, were retaken by the praetor M. Valerius, and the authors of the revolt beheaded. [13] Over 5000 prisoners were sold, the rest of the booty was presented to the soldiers, and the army marched back to Luceria.

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load focus Summary (Latin, Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University, 1940)
load focus Summary (English, Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University, 1940)
load focus Summary (Latin, W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1884)
load focus English (Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University, 1940)
load focus English (D. Spillan, A.M., M.D., Cyrus Evans, 1849)
load focus Latin (Robert Seymour Conway, Charles Flamstead Walters, 1929)
load focus Latin (Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University, 1940)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1884)
hide References (39 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (9):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 31.24
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 33.36
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.19
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.22
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.3
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 39.16
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 40.25
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.5
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.34
  • Cross-references to this page (21):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Luceria
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Praeda
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Sicilinum
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Ti. Sempronius Longus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Vercellium
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Vescellium
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Cumae
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Cumanis
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Grumentum
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Hannibal
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Hanno
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Hirpini
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), CUMAE
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), GRUMENTUM
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), HIRPI´NI
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), LUCE´RIA
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), VESCELLIUM
    • Smith's Bio, Gracchus
    • Smith's Bio, Hanno
    • Smith's Bio, Laevi'nus
    • Smith's Bio, Longus, Sempro'nius
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (9):
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