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A large body of Gauls, induced either by want of room or desire for plunder and convinced that none of the nations through whom they intended to pass was a match for them in arms, marched under the leadership of Brennus into the country of the Dardani. [2] Here a quarrel arose, and as many as 20,000 of them left Brennus and went off under two of their chiefs, Lonorius and Lutarius, into Thrace. [3] Fighting with those who opposed their progress and exacting tribute from those who asked for peace, they reached Byzantium. [4] Here they remained for some time in occupation of the coast of the Propontis, all the cities in that region being tributary to them. When reports from those acquainted with Asia of the fertility of its soil reached their ears, they were seized with the desire of crossing over to it, and after capturing Lysimachia by treachery and making themselves masters of the whole of the Chersonese, they moved down to the Hellespont. [5] They were all the more eager to make the passage when they saw that there was only a narrow strait which separated them, and they sent to Antipater, the governor of the coastal district, asking him to arrange for their transport. [6] The matter took longer than they expected, and a fresh quarrel broke out between the chiefs. Lonorius, with the greater part of the host, returned to Byzantium; Lutarius took two decked ships and three light barques from some Macedonians who had been sent by Antipater, ostensibly as negotiators, but really as spies, and in these vessels he transported one detachment after another, night and day, until he had carried his whole force across. [7] Not long afterwards, Lonorius, with the assistance of Nicomedes king of Bithynia, sailed across from Byzantium. [8] The re-united Gauls assisted Nicomedes in his war against Ziboetas, who was holding a part of Bithynia, and it was mainly owing to them that Ziboetas was defeated and the whole of Bithynia brought under the rule of Nicomedes.

[9] From Bithynia they went further into Asia. Out of the 20,000 men not more than 10,000 were carrying arms, yet so great was the terror they inspired in all the nations west of the Taurus, that those who had no experience of them, [10??] as well as those who had come into contact with them, the most remote as well as their next neighbours, all alike submitted to them. [11] They were made up of three tribes, the Tolostobogii, the Trocmi and the Tectosagi, and in the end they divided the conquered territory of Asia into three parts, each tribe retaining its own tributary cities. [12] The coast of the Hellespont was given to the Trocmi, the Tolostobogii took Aeolis and Ionia, and the Tectosagi received the inland districts. They levied tribute on the whole of Asia west of the Taurus, but fixed their own settlement on both sides of the Halys. [13] Such was the terror of their name and the growth of their numbers that at last even the kings of Syria did not dare to refuse the payment of tribute. [14] The first man in Asia to refuse was Attalus the father of Eumenes, and contrary to universal expectation, fortune favoured his courageous action; he proved himself superior in a pitched battle. The Gauls, however, were not so far disheartened as to renounce their supremacy in Asia; their power remained unimpaired down to the war between Antiochus and Rome. [15] Even then, after the defeat of Antiochus, they quite expected that owing to their distance from the sea the Romans would not advance so far.

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load focus Summary (Latin, Evan T. Sage, Ph.D., 1936)
load focus English (William A. McDevitte, Sen. Class. Mod. Ex. Schol. A.B.T.C.D., 1850)
load focus English (Evan T. Sage, Ph.D., 1936)
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load focus Latin (Evan T. Sage, Ph.D., 1936)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, 1873)
hide References (41 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (4):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 31.14
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 33.21
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.44
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 36.14
  • Cross-references to this page (25):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Lonorius
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Lutarius
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Nieomedes
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Syri
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Tectosagi
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Tolistobogii
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Trocmi
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Aeolis
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Asia
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Attalus.
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Ziboeta
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Brennus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Byzantium
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Conubium
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Galli
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Halys
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), BITHY´NIA
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), CONSTANTINO´POLIS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), GALA´TIA, Gallograecia, Galateia
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), PHRY´GIA
    • Smith's Bio, Attalus
    • Smith's Bio, Attalus I.
    • Smith's Bio, Leonno'rius
    • Smith's Bio, Nicome'des I.
    • Smith's Bio, Ziboetes
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (12):
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