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After dismissing his men he sent messengers to Eposognatus, who was the only Gaulish chief who had remained friendly to Eumenes and refused assistance to Antiochus against the Romans. The consul then resumed his advance; on the first day he reached the Alander and the day after, a village called Tyscon. [2] Here a deputation arrived from Oroanda begging for peace. They were ordered to pay 200 talents, and the consul allowed them to return home and report his demand to their government. [3] From there he marched to Plitendum, his next halting-place being Alyatti. Here the messengers sent to Eposognatus returned in company with envoys from the chief, who begged the consul not to commence hostilities against the Tectosagi, as he would go to them himself and persuade them to submit. His request was granted. Then the army entered a tract of country called Axylon. [4] It derives its name from the character of the soil; not only does it bear nothing in the shape of timber, but not even brambles or thorn bushes grow here, or anything which can serve for fuel. The inhabitants use cow-dung instead of wood. [5] Whilst the Romans were encamped at Cuballum, a fortified place in Gallograecia, a body of enemy cavalry appeared making a great tumult. Their sudden attack not only threw the Roman outposts into confusion but caused some losses amongst them. [6] As the tumult reached the camp, the Roman cavalry hurrying out from all the gates routed the Gauls and put them to flight, and a considerable number of the fugitives were slain.

[7] The consul, aware that he was now in the enemy's country, advanced with caution, keeping his force well together and throwing out scouting parties. Marching continuously, he came to the river Sangarius, and as there was no possibility of fording it, he decided to construct a bridge. [8] The Sangarius rises in the Adoreos range and flowing through Phrygia mingles its waters with the Tymbris on the frontier of Bithynia, and with its volume thus increased flows through Bithynia and empties itself into the Propontis. It is not, however, so remarkable for its size as for the vast quantity of fish with which it supplies the inhabitants. [9] When the bridge was completed the army crossed the river and as they were marching along the bank they were met by the "Galli" or priests of the Mater Magna from Pessinus with their insignia, who prophesied in mystic and oracular verses that the goddess was granting the Romans safety and victory in the war and the sovereignty of the country in which they were. [10] The consul welcomed the omen and fixed his camp for the night on that very spot. [11] The next day he arrived at Gordium. This is not a large place but it possesses a widely-known and much-frequented market; a larger one, in fact, than most inland towns. [12] It is almost equally distant from three seas, the Hellespont, the Euxine at Sinope, and the sea which washes the shores of Cilicia, and also adjoins the territories of several large populations, who for the sake of mutual commercial advantages have made this their business centre. The Romans found it deserted, the inhabitants having fled, and stored with goods of every description. [13] Whilst they were encamped here, envoys from Eposognatus arrived with the intelligence that he had interviewed the Gaulish chiefs but could not make them listen to reason. [14] They were abandoning their villages and farms in the open country, and together with their wives [15??] and children were carrying their portable property and driving their flocks and herds before them towards Olympus. Here they intended to defend themselves by arms and their strong position.

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load focus Summary (Latin, Evan T. Sage, Ph.D., 1936)
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load focus English (William A. McDevitte, Sen. Class. Mod. Ex. Schol. A.B.T.C.D., 1850)
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load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
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  • Commentary references to this page (10):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 31.14
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 32.15
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 33.37
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 36.36
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 37.31
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 37.9
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 39.54
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 41.19
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 42.67
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.9
  • Cross-references to this page (34):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Olympus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Oroandenses
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Pessinus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Plitendum
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Sangarius
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Sinope
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Thymbris
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Tolistobogii
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Tyscos
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Adoreus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Alyattos
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Axylos
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Bos
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Cilices
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Cuballum
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Epposso?natus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Fimus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Gallograecis
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Gordium
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Hellespontus
    • Harper's, Oroanda
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), ADOREUS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), ALANDER
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), A´XYLUS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), CEPHALLE´NIA
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), CUBALLUM
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), GALA´TIA, Gallograecia, Galateia
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), GO´RDIUM
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), OROANDA
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), PAPHLAGO´NIA
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), PESSINUS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), SANGA´RIUS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), THYMBRES
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), TYMBRES
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (21):
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