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Now came the campaign against the Tectosagi, and the consul commenced his advance against them. In a three days' march he reached Ancyra, a city of importance in that district, and the enemy were only ten miles distant from it. [2] Whilst he was here in camp a remarkable incident occurred in connection with a female prisoner. The wife of a chief named Orgiagon, a woman of exceptional beauty, was with other captives in the custody of a centurion who was notorious even amongst soldiers for his licentiousness and greed. [3] At first he made improper proposals to her, but finding that she treated them with abhorrence, he took advantage of her servile condition and violated her. [4] Then, to assuage her anger and shame at the outrage, he held out hopes to her of returning to her friends, but not as a lover would have done without ransom. He stipulated for a certain weight of gold, and to prevent his men from knowing anything about it, he allowed her to choose one of the prisoners and send a message by him to her friends. [5] A spot by the river was fixed upon where not more than two of her friends were to come with the gold on the following night and receive her. [6] There happened to be amongst the prisoners one of her own slaves, and this man was conducted by the centurion beyond the ramparts as soon as it was dark. [7] The following night two of her friends and the centurion with his captive met at the place. [8] Whilst they were showing him the gold, which amounted to an Attic talent-the sum agreed upon-the woman speaking in her own language ordered them to draw their swords and cut off the centurion's head while he was counting out the gold. [9] Wrapping up the murdered man's head in her robe, she took it to her husband, who had fled home from Olympus. [10] Before embracing him she flung down the head at his feet, and whilst he was wondering whose head it could possibly be, or what such an unwomanly act could mean, she told him about the outrage she had endured and the revenge she had taken for her violated chastity. [11] It is recorded that by the purity and strictness of her life she maintained to the very last the honour of a deed so worthy of a matron.

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load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, 1873)
load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1873)
load focus Summary (English, Evan T. Sage, Ph.D., 1936)
load focus Summary (Latin, W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Summary (Latin, Evan T. Sage, Ph.D., 1936)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Latin (Evan T. Sage, Ph.D., 1936)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, 1873)
load focus English (William A. McDevitte, Sen. Class. Mod. Ex. Schol. A.B.T.C.D., 1850)
load focus English (Evan T. Sage, Ph.D., 1936)
hide References (24 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (7):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.31
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.46
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 36.32
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 39.11
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 39.18
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 42.46
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.19
  • Cross-references to this page (9):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Cn. Manlius Vulso
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Ortiagon
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Talentum
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Tectosagi
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Ancyra
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Caput
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Gallas
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), ANCY´RA
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), GALA´TIA, Gallograecia, Galateia
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (2):
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (6):
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