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2. In the following year Quintus Servilius, (for he was consul with Spurius Posthumius,) being sent against the Aequans, fixed his camp in the Latin territory: inaction necessarily kept the army within the camp, involved as they were in a distemper. [2] The war was protracted to the third year, Quintus Fabius and Titus Quintius being consuls. To Fabius, because he, as conqueror, had granted1 peace to the Aequans, that province was assigned by an extraordinary commission: who, setting out with certain hope that the fame of his name would reduce the Aequans to submission, sent ambassadors to the council of the nation, and ordered them to say “that Quintus Fabius, the consul, stated that he had brought peace to Rome from the Aequans, that from Rome he now brought war to the Aequans, that same right hand being armed, which he had formerly given to them in amity; [4] that the gods were now witnesses, and would presently be avengers of those by whose perfidy and perjury that was brought to pass. That he, however, be matters as they [5] might, would even now prefer that the Aequans should repent of their own accord than be [p. 160]subject to the vengeance of an enemy. If they repent, that there would be a safe retreat in [6] that clemency already experienced; but if they still delighted in perjury, they would wage war with the angry gods rather than with enemies.” This statement had so [7] little effect on any of them, that the ambassadors were near being ill-treated, and an army was sent to Algidum against the Romans. When these tidings were brought to Rome, the indignity of the affair, rather than the danger, called out the other [8] consul from the city; thus two consular armies advanced against the enemy in order of battle, so that they might at once engage. But as it so happened that much of the day did not now remain, a person from the advanced guard of the enemy cries out, “This is making a display of war, Romans, not waging it; you draw up your army in [9] line of battle, when night is at hand; we require a greater length of day-light for [10] the contest which is to come on. To-morrow by sun-rise return to the field: you shall have an opportunity of fighting, never fear.” The soldiers, stung by these threats, are marched back into the camp till the following day; thinking that the approaching night was tedious, which would cause delay to the contest. Then indeed they refresh their bodies with food and sleep: [11] on the following day, when it was light, the Roman army took their post considerably sooner. At length the Aequans also came forward. The battle was obstinate on both sides, because both the Romans fought under the influence of resentment and hatred; and a consciousness of danger brought [12] on by misconduct, and despair of obtaining future confidence afterwards, obliged the Aequans to exert and have recourse to the most desperate efforts. The Aequans however did not withstand the Roman troops, and when on being beaten they had betaken themselves to their own territories, the outrageous multitude, with dispositions not at all more disposed to peace, began to chide their leaders: “that their interest was committed to the hazard of a pitched battle, in which mode of fighting the Romans were superior. That the Aequans were better fitted for [13] depredations and incursions, and that several parties acting in different directions conducted wars more successfully than the unwieldy mass of one single army.”

1 Dederat. The oratio obliqua would require dederit here, ut such instances of the [3] indicative being used for the subjunctive are by no means infrequent.

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  • Commentary references to this page (19):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 31.15
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 31.9
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 32.27
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 33.5
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 34.2
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.18
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 36.9
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 37.1
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 37.49
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 39.36
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 39.45
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 39.51
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 40.26
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 42.49
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 43.1
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.22
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.8
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.13
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.2
  • Cross-references to this page (18):
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (18):
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