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12. The war being thus concluded, after rewards and punishment were distributed according to the deserts of each, Titus Manlius returned to Rome: on his approach it appears that the aged only went forth to meet him; and that the young men, both then, and all his life after, detested and cursed him. [2] The Antians made incursions on the territories of Ostia, Ardea, and Solonia. The consul Manlius, because he was unable by reason of his health to conduct that war, nominated as dictator Lucius Papirius Crassus, who then happened to be praetor; by him Lucius Papirius Cursor was appointed master of the horse. [3] Nothing worthy of mention was performed against the Antians by the dictator, although he had kept a standing camp for several months in the Antian territory. [4] To a year signalized by a victory over so many and such powerful states, further by the illustrious death of one of the consuls, as well as by the unrelenting, though memorable, severity of command in the other, there succeeded as consuls Titus Aemi- [p. 520]lius Mamercinus and Quintus Publilius Philo; neither to a similar opportunity of exploits, and they themselves being mindful rather of their own interests as well as of those of the parties in the state, than of the interests of their country. [5] They routed on the plains of Ferentinum, and stripped of their camp, the Latins, who, in resentment of the land they had lost, took up arms again. [6] Publilius, under whose guidance and auspices the action had been fought, receiving the submission of the Latin states, who had lost a great many of their young men there, Aemilius marched the army to Pedum. [7] The people of Pedum were supported by the states of Tibur, Praeneste, and Velitrae; auxiliaries had also come from Lanuvium and Antium. [8] Where, though the Romans had the advantage in several engagements, still the entire labour remained at the city of Pedum itself and at the camp of the allied states, which was adjoining the city: [9] suddenly leaving the war unfinished, because he heard that a triumph was decreed to his colleague, he himself also returned to Rome to demand a triumph before a victory had been obtained. [10] The senate displeased by this ambitious conduct, and refusing a triumph unless Pedum was either taken or should surrender, Aemilius, alienated from the senate in consequence of this act, administered the remainder of the consulship like to a seditious tribuneship. [11] For, as long as he was consul, he neither ceased to criminate the patricians to the people, his colleague by no means interfering, because he himself also was a plebeian; [12] (the scanty distribution of the land among the commons in the Latin and Falernian territory afforded the groundwork of the criminations;) and when the senate, wishing to put an end to the administration of the consuls, ordered a dictator to be nominated against the Latins, who were again in arms, Aemilius, [13??] to whom the fasces then belonged, nominated his colleague dictator; by him Junius Brutus was constituted master of the horse. [14] The dictatorship was popular, both in consequence of his discourses containing invectives against the patricians, and because he passed three laws, most advantageous to the commons, and injurious to the nobility; [15] one, that the orders of the commons should be binding on all the Romans; another, that the patricians should, before the suffrages commenced, declare their approbation of the laws which should be passed in the assemblies of the centuries; [16] the third, that one at least of the censors [p. 521]should be elected from the commons, as they had already gone so far as that it was lawful that both the consuls should be plebeians. [17] The patricians considered that more of detriment had been sustained on that year from the consuls and dictator than was counterbalanced by their success and achievements abroad.

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load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1898)
load focus Summary (Latin, Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D., 1926)
load focus Summary (English, Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D., 1926)
load focus Summary (Latin, W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1898)
load focus English (Rev. Canon Roberts, 1912)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1898)
load focus Latin (Charles Flamstead Walters, Robert Seymour Conway, 1919)
load focus Latin (Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D., 1926)
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  • Commentary references to this page (7):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 32.38
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 33.20
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 34.6
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.50
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 40.30
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.33
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.39
  • Cross-references to this page (47):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Latini
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Lavinium.
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Lex
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, T. Manlius L. F.
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Osteinsis
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, L. Papirius Crassus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, L. Papirius Cursor
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Patres
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Pedum
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Plebiscitum
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Populus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Praenestini
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Q. Publilius Philo
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Quirites
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Senatus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Solonius
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Tiburtes
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Antiates
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Ti. Aemilius Mamercinus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Veliterni
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, I. Brutus Scaeva
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Campi
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Comitia
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Dictator
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Fenectani
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, D. Iunius Brutus
    • Harper's, Brutus
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), AUCTOR´ITAS PATRUM
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), CENSOR
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), COMIT´IA
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), CONSUL
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), DICTA´TOR
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), LEX
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), PLEBISCI´TUM
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), PROCONSUL
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), SENATUS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), A´NTIUM
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), FALERNUS AGER
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), LANU´VIUM
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), PEDUM
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), PRAENESTE
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), VELITRAE
    • Smith's Bio, Crassus, Papi'rius
    • Smith's Bio, Cursor
    • Smith's Bio, Mamerci'nus
    • Smith's Bio, Philo, Publi'lius
    • Smith's Bio, Torqua'tus, Ma'nlius
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (18):
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