previous next
24. By these means the king's wrath against the Romans was appeased for the present; but he never abandoned the project of collecting such a force during peace, as would enable him to maintain a war, whenever the fortunate occasion should be offered. [2] He augmented the revenues of his kingdom, not only out of the produce of the lands and the port duties, but also he worked the mines, both the old ones which had been neglected, and new ones which he opened in many places. [3] Then, (in order to restore the former degree of population, which had been diminished by the calamities of war,) he not only caused an increase in the offspring of that generation, by compelling every one [4??] to marry and rear children, but he transplanted a great multitude of Thracians into Macedonia, and, during a long suspension of arms, he employed the utmost assiduity in augmenting, by every possible means, the strength of his kingdom. [5] Causes afterward occurred, which served to revive his animosity against the Romans. [6] Complaints made by the Thessalians and Perrhae- bians, of his holding possession of their towns, and, by ambassadors from king Eumenes, of his having forcibly seized the cities of Thrace, and transplanted great numbers of their people into Macedonia, had been received in such a manner as plainly evinced that they were not thought unworthy of attention. [7] What made the greatest impression on the senate, was, their having been informed, that Philip aimed at the possession of Aenus and Maronea; as to the Thessalians, they regarded them less. [8] Ambassadors came, likewise, from the Athamanians, complaining not of the loss of a part of their territory, nor of encroachment on their frontier, —but that all Athamania had been brought under the dominion and jurisdiction of the king. [9] Exiles from Maronea also appeared, who had been expelled by the king's troops, for having supported the cause of liberty; who reported, that not only Maronea, but Aenus too, was held in subjection by him. [10] Ambassadors came from Philip to defend his conduct, who asserted, that, [p. 1817]nothing had been done without permission from the Roman commanders. [11] That “the states of the Thessalians, Perrhaebians, and Magnesians, and the nation of the Athamanians, with Amynander, had all been engaged in the same cause with the Aetolians. [12] That after the expulsion of king Antiochus, the consul, being himself busy in reducing the towns of $Etolia, had named Philip to subdue those states, and they remained subject to him in consequence of their being conquered by his arms.” [13] The senate, too, that they might not make any decision concerning the king in his absence, sent Quintus Caecilius Metellus, Marcus Baebius Tamphilus, and Tiberius Sempronius, ambassadors to adjust those disputes. [14] Previous to their arrival, a convention of all those states who had disputes with the king, was summoned to meet at Tempe in Thessaly.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1875)
load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, 1875)
load focus Summary (Latin, Evan T. Sage, Ph.D., 1936)
load focus Summary (English, Evan T. Sage, Ph.D., 1936)
load focus Summary (Latin, W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus English (Evan T. Sage, Ph.D., 1936)
load focus English (Rev. Canon Roberts, 1912)
load focus Latin (Evan T. Sage, Ph.D., 1936)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, 1875)
hide References (34 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (9):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 33.35
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 34.32
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 37.60
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.11
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 40.45
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 42.11
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 42.12
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 42.37
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 43.8
  • Cross-references to this page (17):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Maronea
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Maronitae
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Metalla
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Philippus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Tempe
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Thessali
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Aenus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Athamanes
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Athamaniam
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, M. Baebius Tamphilus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Concilium
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Q. Caecilius Metellus
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), VECTIGA´LIA
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), MARONEIA
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), THRA´CIA
    • Smith's Bio, Metellus
    • Smith's Bio, Ta'mphilus
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (7):
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: