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5. Directly after this conversation Laelius sent Masinissa away, and on the following day he weighed anchor at Hippo, his ships booty-laden, and sailing back to Sicily delivered Masinissa's messages to Scipio.

[2] About the same time the ships which had been sent to Mago from Carthage came into port between Ligurian Albingaunum and Genua.1 [3] In that region, as it happened, Mago had his fleet at the time. On hearing the words of the envoys, who urged him to get together the largest possible armies, he at once held a council of Gauls and Ligurians; for great numbers of both nations were present. [4] And he told [p. 227]them that he had been sent to restore their liberty,2 and that forces were being sent to him from home, as they themselves saw; but with what resources, with how large an army that war was to be waged depended upon themselves. [5] There were two Roman armies, he said, one in Gaul,3 the other in Etruria. He was sure that Spurius Lucretius would unite with Marcus Livius;4 that many thousands must be armed for resistance to two generals, two Roman armies. [6] The Gauls said that they were entirely willing to do so, but that since they had almost before their eyes one Roman camp within their borders and another in the neighbouring land of Etruria, if it should become known that they had aided the Carthaginian by furnishing auxiliaries, forthwith hostile armies would invade their territory from both directions. From Gauls he should require such support as could be given in secret. [7] Ligurians were free to act, they said, since Roman camps were far from their land and their cities; it was right that they should arm their young men and take their proper share in the war. [8] The Ligurians did not refuse, but simply asked for two months' time to hold levies. Meanwhile Mago by sending men secretly through their territory hired Gauls as soldiers. Supplies also of every kind were coming to him in secret from the Gallic nations. [9] Marcus Livius led his army of slave-volunteers over from Etruria into Gaul and, having united with Lucretius, prepared to confront Mago, should he move out of Liguria towards the city;5 but should the [p. 229]Carthaginian quietly remain in a distant region6 at the7 foot of the Alps, he too would remain where he was, near Ariminum, for the defence of Italy.

1 For that coast and its ports cf. XXVIII. xlvi. 8 ff. and notes. Here Savo (Savona), or Vada Sabat(i)a (2 1/2 miles farther west), is evidently meant.

2 B.C. 205

3 Cf. XXVIII. ix. 1 and note.

4 Cf. ibid. xlvi. 12 f.; below, xiii. 4.

5 It was safe to assume that he would follow Hasdrubal's example in making for the Adriatic coast, to enter Italy at Ariminum. The shorter Riviera route was never practicable until 109 B.C., when the Via Aurelia was extended to Pisae, Genua, and Vada Sabatia; Strabo V. i. 11; cf. Mommsen C.I.L. V. p. 885.

6 For the broader meaning of angulus = recessus, “remote region,” cf. XXVIII. xii. 6; xlii. 18.

7 B.C. 205

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load focus Summary (Latin, Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University, 1949)
load focus Summary (Latin, W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1884)
load focus Summary (English, Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University, 1949)
load focus Latin (Robert Seymour Conway, Stephen Keymer Johnson, 1935)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1884)
load focus Latin (Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University, 1949)
load focus English (Rev. Canon Roberts, 1912)
load focus English (Cyrus Evans, 1850)
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  • Commentary references to this page (8):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 31.31
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 31.40
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 32.10
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 32.37
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 36.39
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.11
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.6
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.30
  • Cross-references to this page (11):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Ligures.
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, M. Livius
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Mago
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Albingauni
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Ariminum
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), SAGUM
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), SIBYLLI´NI LIBRI
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), GE´NUA
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), LIGU´RIA
    • Smith's Bio, Mago
    • Smith's Bio, Salina'tor, Li'vius
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (5):
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