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11. From Demetrias the king went on to Chalcis, having fallen in love with a young woman of Chalcis, the daughter of Cleoptolemus,1 and when he had worn her father out first [2??] by sending messengers, then by personal requests delivered verbally, the father being reluctant to entangle himself in a match which promised too great difficulties, at length he gained his point, and as if in the midst of peace he celebrated his nuptials and for the rest of the winter, forgetful of the magnitude of the two tasks he had undertaken, the Roman war and the liberation of Greece, laying aside the responsibility for everything he engaged in banquets and the delights which follow wine and then, from weariness rather than satiety of these pleasures, he gave himself over to sleep. [3] This same habit of easy living seized all the king's prefects who were [p. 191]in command of the winter camps everywhere,2 especially in Boeotia; [4] the soldiers too fell into the same way of life, nor did one of them put on his armour or walk his post or perform sentinel-duty or do anything else which pertained to the tasks and duties of a soldier. [5] And so at the beginning of spring,3 when he had come by way of Phocis to Chaeronea, where he had ordered the whole army to assemble from all its stations, he readily perceived that the soldiers had spent the winter under no sterner discipline than their commander. [6] Then he ordered Alexander the Acarnanian and Menippus the Macedonian to conduct their troops to Stratus in Aetolia; he himself offered sacrifice to Apollo at Delphi and proceeded to Naupactus. [7] Having held a conference with the Aetolian chiefs, on the road which leads past Calydon and Lysimachia to Stratus, he met his own men who were marching by way of the Malian gulf. [8] There Mnasilochus, a leading Acarnanian, purchased by many gifts, did not merely by his own efforts win over the people to the king's side, but even brought Clytus the praetor, who at that time held the chief magistracy, over to his own opinion. [9] When he saw that the people of Leucas, this being the principal city of Acarnania, could not easily be induced to rebel, because of their fear of the Roman fleet which was with Atilius and which was off Cephallania, he attacked them-by guile. [10] For when he had said in the council that the interior portions of Acarnania should be defended and that all who could bear arms should repair to Medio and Thyrreum, that these towns might not be captured by Antiochus or the Aetolians, there were some who argued that it was unnecessary that all should be called out as for a [p. 193]major emergency, but that a garrison of five hundred4 men was adequate. [11] Obtaining this number of young men and placing three hundred at Medio and two hundred at Thyrreum as garrisons, he so conducted matters that these might fall into the hands of the king to serve as hostages.

1 Polybius (XX. viii.) adds other details, that Antiochus was now fifty years old, that Cleoptolemus was a man of rank, and that his daughter, whom Antiochus named Euboea, was of extraordinary beauty, and that she escaped to Ephesus after the defeat at Thermopylae. On the other hand, he says nothing of the reluctance of her father to permit the match, and he makes less of the unsuitability of Antiochus' conduct.

2 B.C. 191

3 In iii. 14 above the narrative of events in Rome was brought up to May. The account of events in Greece is now abreast of it.

4 B.C. 191

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load focus Summary (Latin, Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Latin (Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
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  • Commentary references to this page (18):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, textual notes, 31.14
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 33.17
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 33.34
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 34.6
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.34
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.51
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 37.44
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.4
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.9
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 39.23
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 42.37
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 42.42
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 42.6
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 42.67
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 43.17
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 43.21
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.12
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.27
  • Cross-references to this page (23):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Leucas
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Medion
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Mnasilochus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Sinus Maliacus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Stratus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Thyrium
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Acarnanes
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Antiochus Magnus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Apollini
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Virgines
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Calydon
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Chaeronea
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Cleoptatemi
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Clytus
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), STRATE´GUS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), ACARNA´NIA
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), CHALCIS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), LYSIMA´CHIA
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), ME´DEON
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), STRATUS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), THY´RIUM
    • Smith's Bio, Cleopto'lemus
    • Smith's Bio, Mnasi'lochus
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (11):
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