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19. Flaccus did not enjoy the same fortune at Tichius and Rhoduntia, having tried in vain to get up to those forts. [2] The Macedonians and the others who were in the king's camp at first, while there was nothing visible in the distance except a crowd and a column, believed that the Aetolians had seen the battle from afar and were coming to their assistance; [3] but as soon as the standards and arms, recognized close at hand, revealed their mistake, such [p. 217]terror all at once seized them that they threw away1 their arms and fled. [4] Both the walls and the narrowness of the valley through which they had to pass hindered the pursuers, and most of all the fact that the elephants brought up the rear, and these the infantry could pass only with difficulty and the cavalry not at all, since the horses were frightened and caused greater disturbance in their own ranks than in the battle; [5] some time was also consumed in the plundering of the camp; nevertheless, they pursued the enemy that day as far as Scarphea. [6] They not only killed and captured many, men and horses, on the way, but also killed the elephants which they could not take, and returned to camp; [7] this had been attacked during the time the battle was going on by the Aetolians who were holding Heraclea with their garrison, but without any results commensurate with the considerable boldness of the undertaking. [8] During the third watch of the next night the consul sent on the cavalry to pursue the enemy and at daybreak advanced the legionary standards. [9] The king had gone a considerable distance ahead, inasmuch as he had not ceased his headlong flight until he reached Elatia; there, as soon as he collected the scanty leavings of the battle and the flight, with a little band of half-armed men he withdrew to Chalcis. [10] The Roman cavalry did not overtake the king himself at Elatia; but a great part of the column, stopping either from weariness or because they had lost their way, as was natural for men fleeing without guides over strange roads, was dispersed and destroyed; [11] nor did anyone out of the whole army escape with the exception of five hundred who were with the king, a small number even out of the ten thousand [p. 219]soldiers who, as I have written2 on the authority of3 Polybius, the king had brought with him to Greece; [12] what if we were to believe Valerius Antias, who writes that there were sixty thousand men in the king's army, that forty thousand of them were killed and more than five thousand captured along with two hundred thirty military standards. One hundred fifty Romans perished in the actual shock of the battle, and from those who defended themselves against the attack of the Aetolians not more than fifty were killed.

1 B.C. 191

2 Cf. XXXV. xliii. 6. Livy does not take into account the replacements who came over later (xv. 3 above.)

3 B.C. 191

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load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1873)
load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, 1873)
load focus Summary (English, Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus Summary (Latin, W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Summary (Latin, Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus English (Rev. Canon Roberts, 1912)
load focus Latin (Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus English (Cyrus Evans, 1850)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, 1873)
hide References (31 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (14):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 33.10
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 33.15
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 33.3
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.34
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.43
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.46
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 37.20
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 37.34
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 40.40
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 40.58
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 42.30
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.39
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.24
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Ajax, 1160
  • Cross-references to this page (9):
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (7):
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