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24. When the consul had stopped the siege at midnight, during the fourth watch he again launched a furious attack from three sides, [2??] ordering Tiberius Sempronius on one side to hold his men alert and await orders, thinking that without doubt, in a night alarm, the enemy would rush to the point from which the noise was heard. [3] Part of the Aetolians who had been sleeping were rousing themselves, exhausted by toil and loss of sleep, part, who were still awake, rushed in the dark towards the shouts of the fighters. [4] Some of the enemy were trying to [p. 231]climb over the fallen ruins of the wall, some1 attempting to get up by means of ladders, and against them the Aetolians rushed from all sides to bring aid. [5] The one side, on which there were buildings outside the city, was neither defended nor attacked; but men to attack it were waiting, eager for the signal; there was no one to defend it. [6] It was now growing light when the consul gave the signal; and without any opposition some climbed over the half-fallen walls, others with ladders surmounted the uninjured sections. At the same moment the shout which testifies that a city has been taken was heard; the Aetolians from all sides left their posts and fled to the citadel. [7] The victors, with the permission of the consul, plundered the city, not so much from any wrath or hatred as that the soldiers, restrained in the case of so many cities recovered from the enemy, might in some place at last see the fruits of victory. [8] The soldiers were then recalled at about midday, and when he had divided them into two parts he ordered one to be led around at the foot of the mountain to a cliff which, being about its equal in height, was cut off from the citadel by, as it were, a valley lying between them; [9] but the summits of the two heights were so close together that from the other crest weapons could be hurled into the citadel; with the other half of the troops the consul intended to climb the citadel from the town and was waiting for the signal from those who were to come out on the cliff from the rear. [10] The Aetolians who were in the citadel did not endure first the shout of the party which had taken the cliff, then the attack of the Romans from the town, being now both broken in spirit and unprepared with anything necessary to [p. 233]resist any longer an attack there, especially since2 the women and children and the other noncombatants had collected in the citadel, which could scarce hold the defenders and still less protect so great a crowd. [11] And so at the first assault they threw down their arms and surrendered. [12] Among those thus given up was Damocritus, the chief of the Aetolians, who, at the beginning of hostilities, when Titus Quinctius had asked for the decree of the Aetolians by which they had voted to invite Antiochus, had replied that he would give it to him in Italy when they had encamped there.3 By reason of this violent disposition his surrender was a greater pleasure to the victors.

1 B.C. 191

2 B.C. 191

3 Cf. XXXV. xxxiii. 9-10, and for his death, XXXVII. xlvi. 5.

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load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1873)
load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, 1873)
load focus Summary (English, Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus Summary (Latin, W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Summary (Latin, Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus English (Rev. Canon Roberts, 1912)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus English (Cyrus Evans, 1850)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, 1873)
load focus Latin (Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
hide References (19 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (7):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 31.42
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 37.11
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 37.27
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.22
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.7
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 39.13
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 43.19
  • Cross-references to this page (5):
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (7):
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