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40. To this the consul replied that the Ligures had not been allotted to him as his province, that he had not waged war with the Ligures, that he was not asking for a triumph over them; [2] he felt sure that in a short time Quintus Minucius, having conquered them, would ask and receive a well-earned triumph; [3] he was asking for a triumph over the Gallic Boii, whom he had defeated in battle, whom he had stripped of their camp, whose entire population he had, two days after the battle, received in surrender, from whom he had taken hostages as a guarantee of future peace. [4] But this, as a matter of fact, was of far greater importance —that he had [p. 271]slain a greater number of thousands of Gauls in battle1 than any commander before him had ever fought with, at least so far as the Boii were concerned.2 [5] More than half of their fifty thousand men were killed,3 many thousands captured; old men and boys only were now left to the Boii. [6] Could anyone then wonder why a victorious army, since it left no enemy in the province, should come to Rome to celebrate the triumph of the consul? [7] If the senate wished to use the assistance of these soldiers in another province also, in which way, pray, would it believe them to be more ready to meet another danger and new toil, if without any objection the reward had been paid them for their previous danger and toil, or if they sent them away with hope in place of reality, when they had once been deceived as to their original expectation? [8] So far as he personally was concerned, he had won sufficient glory for his whole life on that day when the senate had judged him the best man and sent him to receive the Idaean Mother.4 [9] From that one inscription, even if no consulship or triumph were added, the imago5 of Publius Scipio Nasica would have enough of honour and regard. [10] The entire senate of its own accord not only agreed to vote the triumph but by its influence compelled the tribune to withdraw his veto. Publius Cornelius while consul triumphed over the Boii. [11] In that triumph he transported in Gallic carts arms and standards and spoils of every description and Gallic vases of bronze, and [p. 273]along with prisoners of high rank a herd of captured6 horses. He carried also golden necklaces to the number of one thousand four hundred and seventy-one, and besides he had two hundred and forty-seven pounds of gold, of [12??] silver, unwrought and wrought in Gallic vases, not unskilfully, in their manner, two thousand three hundred and forty pounds, of coins stamped with the two-horse chariot, two hundred and thirty-four thousand.7 To the soldiers who followed his car he gave one hundred and twenty-five asses to each infantryman, twice that sum to each centurion and thrice to each cavalryman. [13] The next day he called an assembly, and when he had spoken of his achievements and of the injury done by [14??] the tribune who tried to entangle him in another's war, in order to cheat him of the fruits of his victory, he absolved his soldiers of their oaths and discharged them.

1 B.C. 191

2 If the text is sound, it means that more Gauls had fallen in this battle than the Boi had ever been able to put in the field in previous engagements.

3 Cf. xxxviii. 6 above.

4 Cf. xxxvi. 3 above and the note.

5 A Roman house had a special room set aside for the imagines or masks of distinguished ancestors. To each was attached a tablet (titulus) listing the offices each man had held and the other honours he had won.

6 B.C. 191

7 This is said to be the first Gallic triumph in which no copper coins were displayed: cf. XXXIII. xxxvii. 11.

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load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, 1873)
load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1873)
load focus Summary (English, Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus Summary (Latin, W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Summary (Latin, Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus Latin (Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus English (Cyrus Evans, 1850)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, 1873)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus English (Rev. Canon Roberts, 1912)
hide References (33 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (12):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 34.46
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 37.27
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 37.5
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 37.58
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.47
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.58
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.59
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 39.4
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 39.50
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 40.7
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.39
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.40
  • Cross-references to this page (13):
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (8):
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