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50. Then the question of the provinces was brought1 up by the consuls; [2] it was decided that they should draw lots for Aetolia and Asia; [3] the one to whom Asia was allotted should be assigned the army which Lucius Scipio had, and as reinforcement for it four thousand Roman infantry and two hundred cavalry, and of the allies of the Latin confederacy eight thousand infantry and four hundred cavalry; with these forces he was to conduct the war against Antiochus. [4] To the other consul the army which was in Aetolia was decreed, and he was authorized to enlist as reinforcements the same number of citizens and allies as his colleague. [5] The same consul, moreover, was directed to fit out and take with him the ships which had been built the year before;2 and not to wage war with the Aetolians alone, but also to cross to the island of Cephallania.3 [6] The same consul was instructed, if he could do so advantageously to the state, to come to Rome for the elections; for, apart from the fact that the new annual magistrates were to be chosen, it was their pleasure to elect censors also. [7] If anything detained him, he should inform the senate that he could not be present at the time of the elections. [8] Aetolia fell to Marcus Fulvius, Asia to Gnaeus Manlius, as a result of the drawing. The praetors then drew lots, and Spurius Postumius Albinus received the civil jurisdiction and that between citizens and aliens, Marcus Sempronius Tuditanus Sicily, Quintus Fabius Pictor, the priest of Quirinus, Sardinia, Quintus Fabius Labeo the fleet, Lucius Plautius Hypsaeus Nearer Spain, Lucius Baebius Dives Farther Spain. [9] For Sicily one legion and the fleet which was in the province were decreed; and the [p. 439]new praetor was ordered to levy two tithes of grain on4 the Sicilians; one of them he should send to Asia, the other to Aetolia. [10] The same was also ordered to be exacted from the Sardinians and the corn shipped to the same armies as that from Sicily. [11] To Lucius Baebius as replacements for service in Spain were given one thousand Roman infantry and fifty cavalry and six thousand infantry and two hundred cavalry of the Latin confederacy; [12] to Plautius Hypsaeus for Nearer Spain were assigned one thousand Roman infantry5 and of the allies of the Latin confederacy two thousand infantry and two hundred cavalry; with these additions the two Spains would have one legion each. [13] As for the magistrates of the year before, prorogation of the imperium for one year was ordered for Gaius Laelius with his army; the same was done for Publius Junius, propraetor in Etruria, with the army which was in the province, and for Marcus Tuccius, propraetor among the Brutti and in Apulia.

1 B.C. 189

2 Cf. iv. 5 above.

3 Cf. XXXVI. xxxi. 10 and the note.

4 B.C. 189

5 Probably a phrase concerning Roman cavalry has been lost.

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load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, 1873)
load focus Notes (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Summary (Latin, Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus Summary (Latin, W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Summary (English, Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, 1873)
load focus English (Rev. Canon Roberts, 1912)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Latin (Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh, 1935)
load focus English (William A. McDevitte, Sen. Class. Mod. Ex. Schol. A.B.T.C.D., 1850)
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  • Commentary references to this page (11):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 31-32, commentary, 32.28
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.20
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 35.41
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 36.11
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 37.47
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.35
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.36
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.42
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.55
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 39.23
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 39-40, commentary, 40.18
  • Cross-references to this page (21):
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