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58. At first the Bastarnae marched with their column peacefully inclined. Then, after the departure of Cotto and Antigonus and, not much later, after the receipt of the news of the death of Philip, neither were the Thracians easy to negotiate with nor could the Bastarnae be satisfied with what they could buy nor could they be kept in column without leaving the line of march. [2] In consequence injuries were inflicted on both sides, and as these increased day by day war flared up. Finally, when the Thracians were unable to withstand the strength and numbers of the enemy, leaving the villages in the plains they fell back to a mountain of great height —they call it Donuca. [3] When the Bastarnae tried to climb it, they were caught, as they attempted in vain to scale the heights of the mountains, by such a storm as that which, as the story goes, destroyed the Gauls as [p. 177]they pillaged Delphi.1 [4] For not merely were they2 assailed with a deluge of rain and then masses of hail, along with tremendous crashes in the sky and thunders and lightning-flashes blinding their eyes, but also the bolts flashed all about [5??] them so that their own bodies seemed to be the targets, and not only the common soldiers but even the chieftains fell stricken on the ground. [6] So when in headlong flight in their blindness they were rushing about and falling over lofty cliffs, the Thracians too came upon them in their panic, but they themselves said that the gods were the causes of their flight and that the skies were falling upon them3 Scattered by the tempest, as if after a shipwreck, when many of them, half-armed, had returned to the camp whence they had set out, they began to consider what they should do. [7] Then a disagreement arose, some thinking that they should return home, others that they should make their way into Dardania; [8] about thirty thousand men, under the command of Clondicus, arrived at the place for which they had set out, the rest of the population returned to Apollonia and Mesembria4 by the way they had come. [9] Perseus, having gained the throne, ordered Antigonus5 to be put to death; and until he could strengthen his position he sent ambassadors to Rome to renew his father's friendship and to ask that he be called king by the senate. Such were the events of the year in Macedonia.

1 Cf. Justin XXIV. viii. 9-10.

2 B.C. 179

3 Cf. Arrian, Anab. I. iv. 8; ἔφασαν (οἱ κέλτοι) δεδιέναι μήποτε οὐρανὸς αὐτοῖς ἐμπέσοι.

4 These cities were on the Thracian coast of the Euxine.

5 The Antigonus whom Philip had chosen as his successor.

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load focus Summary (Latin, Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D., 1938)
load focus English (Rev. Canon Roberts, 1912)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller, 1911)
load focus Latin (W. Weissenborn, 1875)
load focus English (William A. McDevitte, Sen. Class. Mod. Ex. Schol. A.B.T.C.D., 1850)
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  • Commentary references to this page (8):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 34.47
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 36.17
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 35-38, commentary, 38.16
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 41-42, commentary, 41.19
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 43-44, commentary, 44.26
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.30
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.44
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, book 45, commentary, 45.9
  • Cross-references to this page (7):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Senatus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Tempestas
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Antigonus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Bastarnae
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Clondicus
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita, Index, Donuca
    • Smith's Bio, Anti'gonus
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (13):
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