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address to prepare, to make ready: “address me to my appointment,” THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR, iii. 5. 118 ; “he does address himself unto,” ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL, iii. 6. 87 ; “Address yourself to entertain them,” THE WINTER'S TALE, iv. 4. 53 ; “Address thee instantly,” 2 HENRY VI., v. 2. 27 ; “Let us address to tend on Hector's heels,” TROILUS AND CRESSIDA, iv. 4. 145 ; “address Itself to motion,” HAMLET, i. 2. 216 ; “Were all address'd to meet you,” LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST, ii. 1. 83 ; “the Prologue is address'd,” A MIDSUMMER-NIGHT'S DREAM, v. 1. 106 ; “have I address'd me,” THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, ii. 9. 19 ; “Address'd a mighty power,” AS YOU LIKE IT, v. 4. 150 ; “Our navy is address'd,” 2 HENRY IV., iv. 4. 5 ; “for the march are we addrest,” HENRY V., iii. 3. 58 ; “He is address'd,” JULIUS CAESAR, iii. 1. 29 ; “address'd them Again to sleep,” MACBETH, ii. 2. 24 ; “Even in your armours, as you are address'd,” PERICLES, ii. 3. 95 ; “address'd to answer his desire,” THE RAPE OF LUCRECE, 1606.

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