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mere absolute, entire: “Upon his mere request,” MEASURE FOR MEASURE, v. 1. 152 ; “his mere enemy,” THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, iii. 2. 264 ; “mere oblivion,” AS YOU LIKE IT, ii. 7. 165 ; “mere the truth” ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL, iii. 5. 52 (the absolute truth); “Your mere enforcement,” RICHARD III., iii. 7. 233 ; “to the mere undoing Of all the kingdom,” HENRY VIII., iii. 2. 329 ; “In mere oppugnancy,” TROILUS AND CRESSIDA, i. 3. 111 ; “Of your mere own,” MACBETH, iv. 3. 89 ; “This is mere madness,” HAMLET, v. 1. 278 ; “the mere perdition of the Turkish fleet,” OTHELLO, ii. 2. 3 ; “Our faith mere folly,” ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA, iii. 13. 43 ; “to thy mere confusion,” CYMBELINE, iv. 2. 93 ; “that opinion a mere profit,” PERICLES, iv. 2. 122 ; “two mere blessings,” THE TWO NOBLE KINSMEN, ii. 2. 58.

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