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rat “without a tail—A,” MACBETH, i. 3. 9. “It should be remembered (for it was the belief of the times) that though a witch could assume the form of any animal she pleased, the tail would still be wanting. The reason given by some of the old writers for such a deficiency is, that though the hands and feet, by an easy change, might be converted into the four paws of a beast, there was still no part about a woman which corresponded with the length of tail common to almost all our four-footed creatures” (STEEVENS) .

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