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sad serious, grave: “sad talk,” THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA, i. 3. 1 ; THE WINTER'S TALE, iv. 4. 304; “sad conference,” MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, i. 3. 52 ; “in silence sad,” A MIDSUMMER-NIGHT'S DREAM, iv. 1. 92 ; “a sad ostent,” THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, ii. 2. 181 ; “Sad Lucretia's modesty,” AS YOU LIKE IT, iii. 2. 138 ; “sad brow,” AS YOU LIKE IT, iii. 2. 199 ; 2 HENRY IV., v. 1. 80; “sad and civil,” TWELFTH NIGHT, iii. 4. 5 ; “a sad face,” TWELFTH NIGHT, iii. 4. 69 ; “that sad dog” RICHARD II., v. 5. 70 ( “that grave, that gloomy villain,” STEEVENS) ; “Sad, high, and working,” HENRY VIII., Prologue, 3 ; “Narcissus was a sad boy,” THE TWO NOBLE KINSMEN, iv. 2. 32 ; “Sad pause,” THE RAPE OF LUCRECE, 277 ; “sad-eyed” HENRY V., i. 2. 202 (with serious eye or look); “with slow sad gait,” THE RAPE OF LUCRECE, 1081.

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