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tall able, bold, stout: “tall fellows,” THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR, ii. 1. 204 ; ii. 2. 10; “tall ship,” THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, iii. 1. 5 ; OTHELLO, ii. 1. 79; “as tall a man as any's in Illyria,” TWELFTH NIGHT, i. 3. 18 ; “tall fellow,” THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, iv. 4. 17 ; 1 HENRY IV., i. 3. 62; 2 HENRY IV., v. 1. 56; RICHARD III., i. 4. 149; “tall ships,” RICHARD II., ii. 1. 286 ;THE TWO NOBLE KINSMEN, ii. 2. 12; “tall gentleman,” 2 HENRY IV., iii. 2. 60 ; “Thy spirits are most tall,” HENRY V., ii. 1. 66 ; “a very tall man,” ROMEO AND JULIET, ii. 4. 30 ; “yond tall anchoring bark,” KING LEAR, iv. 6. 18 ; “much tall youth,” ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA, ii. 6. 7 ; “a tall young man,” THE TWO NOBLE KINSMEN, iv. 1. 82 ; “a taller man than I,” THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, iv. 1. 9. (I may notice that tall sometimes conveyed the idea of a good figure: “Tal, or semely, Decens, elegans. Prompt. Parv.; “A goodly and a comely man, or a tall man. Homo eleganti forma.” Hormanni Vulgaria, sig. G v. ed. 1530. )

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