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Jack a common term of contempt and reproach (fellow, knave, rogue): “you are Jack Rugby,” THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR, i. 4. 52 ; “Jack priest,” THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR, i. 4. 106 ; ii. 3. 28; “play the flouting Jack,” MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, i. 1. 157 ; “twangling Jack,” THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, ii. 1. 157 ; “a swearing Jack,” THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, ii. 1. 280 ; “the prince is a Jack,” 1 HENRY IV., iii. 3. 84 ; “then am I a Jack,” 1 HENRY IV., v. 4. 138 ; “Since every Jack became a gentleman,” RICHARD III., i. 3. 72 ; “thou art as hot a Jack” ROMEO AND JULIET, iii. 1. 11 (where Jack is merely equivalent to“fellow,” and used jocularly),; “Hang him, Jack!” ROMEO AND JULIET, iv. 5. 141 ; “this Jack,” ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA, iii. 13. 93 , 103; “braggarts, Jacks, milksops,” MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, v. 1. 91 ; “bragging Jacks,” THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, iii. 4. 77 ; “insinuating Jacks,” RICHARD III., i. 3. 53 ; “twenty such Jacks,” ROMEO AND JULIET, ii. 4. 148.

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