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All, 1) substantively, the whole, opposed to part, every thing: “all lost,” Tp. I, 1, 54. “all is but fortune,” V, 257. Tw. II, 5, 27. “I leave myself, my friends, and a., for love,” Gentl. I, 1, 65. “I have scanted a. wherein I should your great deserts repay,” Sonn. 117, 1. “I shall have gold for all,” H6B I, 2, 107. “my all,” Sonn. 109, 14. “whose all not equals Edward's moiety,” R3 I, 2, 250. “believe not all,” Ant. III, 4, 11. “have my thanks for all,” IV, 14, 140. “and all to all,” Mcb. III, 4, 92*etc. etc. “the one almost as infinite as all, the other blank as nothing,” Troil. IV, 5, 80, i. e. as the universe. “And thou, all they, hast all the all of me,” Sonn. 31, 14 (being to me instead of all deceased friends). “The very all of all is,” LLL V, 1, 115.
In all == everything put down to account: “when but in all I was six thousand strong,” H6A IV, 1, 20. All in all, properly every thing in every respect, an expression of mere enforcement for all: “he that can do all in all with her,” H6B II, 4, 51. “he was a man, take him for all in all,” Hml. I, 2, 187 (i. e. consider him with respect to the whole of his qualities). “her love; for that is all in all,” Shr. II, 130. “it hath been all in all his study,” H5 I, 1, 42. “he will do all in all as Hastings doth,” R3 III, 1, 168. “you are all in all in spleen,” Oth. IV, 1, 89. “whom our full senate call all in all sufficient,” Oth. IV, 1, 89
For all == a) once for all: “learn now, for all, I care not for you,” Cymb. II, 3, 111. “for once, for all, and ever,” R2 II, 2, 148. this is for all == in short: Hml. I, 3, 131. b) though: “for all you are my man,” Wiv. I, 1, 281. V, 5, 204. Ven. 342. Cymb. V, 4, 209.
At all, a phrase used by way of enforcement, seldom in affirmative sentences, as: “to bear off any weather at all,” Tp. II, 2, 19. “an if this be at all,” V, 117; oftener with a negation either implied: “desist to build at all,” H4B I, 3, 48. “without expense at all,” H6A I, 1, 76; “without more circumstance at all,” Hml. I, 5, 127; or directly expressed: “not at all,” Pilgr. 274. Gentl. II, 4, 96. Meas. IV, 1, 71. IV, 2, 161. Merch. II, 1, 39. Wint. III, 2, 62. V, 1, 20. H8 II, 4, 84. Tit. II, 1, 119. Rom. II, 2, 112. IV, 3, 21. Caes. III, 1, 248. “no time at all:” Sonn. 57, 3. Meas. II, 4, 66. Mids. I, 2, 100. III, 2, 301. Merch. V, 120. All's III, 6, 103. H6C V, 5, 53. Ant. III, 4, 20. “none at all:” LLL IV, 3, 354. As III, 2, 212. H6B I, 4, 52. R3 II, 3, 24. “nothing at all:” Gentl. I, 1, 144. R3 I, 2, 236. “nought at all:” Ven. 911. Err. IV, 1, 91. “this no more dishonours you at all than . . .” Cor. III, 2, 58.
All is one, cf. One.
And all == and the rest, and every thing else: “Fridays and Saturdays and all,” As IV, 1, 117. “this wins him, liver and all,” Tw. II, 5, 106. “rapier, scabbard and all,” III, 4, 303. “and lose it, life and all,” John III, 4, 144. “words, life and all,” R2 II, 1, 150. “are pluck'd up root and all,” III, 4, 52. “I have entered him and all” H4B II, 1, 11 (Mrs. Quickly). Cor. IV, 2, 27. “leap thou, attire and all, to my heart,” Ant. IV, 8, 14. “bring our crown and all,” V, 2, 232. In the same sense: that you “insult, exult, and all at once, over the wretched,” As III, 5, 36. “did lose his seat and all at once,” H5 I, 1, 36.
This is all == in short: Wint. I, 2, 347.
All but, originally anything except, == scarcely, not even: “Henry's death, my lovely Edward's death, their kingdom's loss, could all but answer for that peevish brat?” R3 I, 3, 194.
“All's not offence,” Lr. II, 4, 199. cf. Ant. V, 2, 326: all's not well.
2) Adjectively and pronominally: a) every, any, any imaginable: “capable of all ill,” Tp. I, 2, 353. “all foison, all abundance,” II, 1, 163. “all happiness bechance to thee,” Gentl. I, 1, 61. “all good,” III, 1, 243. “'gainst all other voice,” Merch. IV, 1, 356. “all bond and privilege of nature break,” Cor. V, 3, 25. “whom with all praise I point at,” II, 2, 94. “all joy befall . . .,” Cymb. III, 5, 9. cf. “all popular rate,” Tp. I, 2, 92. “with all prerogative,” Tp. I, 2, 92 “all strange form,” Compl. 303. “in all desired employment,” LLL IV, 2, 140. Cor. I, 3, 8. III, 1, 129. Caes. III, 1, 246. Lr. II, 4, 107. Mcb. III, 1, 13. “on all cause,” Ant. III, 11, 68. “in all haste,” Wiv. III, 3, 14. “I'll make all speed,” Meas. IV, 3, 109. “with all swift speed,” R2 V, 1, 54. And so even: “without all bail,” Sonn. 74, 2. without all doubt (for any doubt) H8 IV, 1, 113. “without all remedy,” Mcb. III, 2, 11. Alls II, 3, 173. Cor. III, 1, 144.
b) the whole, without the article before names of towns and countries as well as the words day and night: “through all Athens,” Mids I, 2, 5. “in all Venice,” Merch. I, 1, 115. “all Kent,” John V, 1, 30. “all France,” H6A I, 1, 139. H6B IV, 8, 17. “all Europe,” H6A I, 1, 156. I, 6, 15. “all day,” Meas. IV, 1, 20. Mids. II, 1, 66. Merch. I, 1, 117. H6A II, 1, 12. H6B III, 1, 186. “all night,” Meas. IV, 3, 46. LLL I, 1, 44. Shr. IV, 1, 208. John IV, 1, 30. H4A IV, 2, 63. Rom. IV, 4, 10. Caes. II, 1, 88. “all night long,” Hml. I, 1, 160.
The article admissible before day and night: “all the day,” Sonn. 43, 2. Wint. IV, 3, 134. “all the night,” Lr. II, 4, 90; indispensable before other words: all the world, Tp. I. 2, 69. “all the rest,” I, 2, 226. II, 1, 287. “all the wine” II, 2, 96. “all the kind of the Launces” Gentl. II, 3, 2. “all the difference,” IV, 4, 195. “all the draff,” Wiv. IV, 2, 109. “all the fool” LLL V, 2, 384. “all the pack of you,” R3 III, 3, 5. etc. etc. Of course, the demonstrative and possessive pronouns serve as well: “all this day,” John III, 1, 18. “all my study,” Tp. I, 2, 74. “all his quality,” I, 2, 193. “in all her trim,” V, 236. “all your part,” Mids. III, 1, 102. “all my flowering youth,” H6A II, 5, 56. “like all your self,” Cor. V, 3, 70. “all his arm,” Hml. II, 1, 88. 95 etc. “all my every part,” Sonn. 62, 2. “You are my all the world,” Sonn. 112, 5. John III, 4, 104.
All the whole, cf. whole.
c) only, alone, nothing but: thou art all my child == my only child, All's III, 2, 71. “to find a face where all distress is stell'd; many she sees where cares have carved some, but none where all distress and dolour dwell'd,” Lucr. 1444 (nothing but, mere distress). “why write I still all one, ever the same?” Sonn. 76, 5, i. e. always but one thing. “I do smell all horsepiss,” Tp. IV, 199. “all torment, trouble, wonder and amazement inhabits here,” Tp. V, 104. “a gentleman of all temperance,” Meas. III, 2, 251 (a gentleman, the groundwork and sum of whose qualities was temperance). “I was born to speak all mirth and no matter,” Ado II, 1, 343. “he is all mirth,” Ado III, 2, 10. “all to make you sport,” Mids. I, 3, 114. “vows so born, in their nativity all truth appears,” III, 2, 125. “and not all love to see you, but jealousy . . .,” Tw. III, 3, 6. “gold, all gold!” Wint. III, 3, 126. “why have my sisters husbands, if they say they love you all?” Lr. I, 1, 102. “I shall never marry like my sisters, to love you all,” Lr. I, 1, 102 “no seconds? all myself?” IV, 6, 198. cf. H4B V, 3, 37.
d) In the plural == every one, the whole number of particulars: “let's all sink,” Tp. I, 1, 67. “all plunged in the foaming brine,” I, 2, 210. “the mariners all under hatches stowed,” I, 2, 210 “they all have met,” I, 2, 210 “we all” II, 1, 251 etc. etc.
All of us == we all, Tp. II, 1, 129. V, 212. Wiv. II, 2, 58. R3 II, 2, 101. Caes. II, 1, 212. “all of you:” R2 IV, 237. H6B III, 1, 165. R3 I, 3, 171. “all of them:” Tp. V, 132. Ado V, 1, 44. “all three of them:” Tp. III, 3, 104. “all of yours:” R2 II, 4, 72.
Joined to a substantive without an article: “all hearts i 'the state,” Tp. I, 2, 84. “all corners else of the earth,” I, 2, 491 etc. The article gives it a restrictive sense: “through all the signories,” Tp. I, 2, 71. “fair Milan with all the honours,” Tp. I, 2, 71 “all the devils,” Tp. I, 2, 71 “all the charms of Sycorax,” Tp. I, 2, 71 “all the qualities of the isle,” Tp. I, 2, 71 “I am all the subjects that you have,” Tp. I, 2, 71 “all the infections that . . .” II, 2, 1. “all the blessings of a glad father,” V, 179 etc. etc. Seemingly in a general acceptation: incensed the seas and shores, yea, all the creatures (sc. that dwell in them) “against your peace,” Tp. III, 3, 74. these are the villains that all the travellers (sc. who have passed through this forest) “do fear so much,” Gentl. IV, 1, 6. Cor. IV, 6, 102.
With a possessive pronoun: “all our reasons,” R3 III, 1, 174. Tp. I, 2, 370. Tp. I, 2, 370 Tp. I, 2, 370 IV, 1, 5 etc. etc.
Used in addressing no more than two persons: “good morrow to you all,” H4B III, 1, 35. “as all you know,” H6B II, 2, 26.
“To all our lamentation,” Cor. IV, 6, 34, == to the lamentation of us all. “to all our sorrows,” John IV, 2, 102 (cf. both).
“Best of all:” H6C II, 5, 18. “last night of all,” Hml. I, 1, 35 (== the very last night). Caes. I, 1, 65.
From the all that are == from all them that are: Wint. V, 1, 14.
3) Adverbially, a) quite, entirely: “no tongue! all eyes!” Tp. IV, 1, 59. Troil. I, 2, 31. “love is all truth,” Ven. 804. “all tyrant,” 149, 4. “she's all grease,” Err. III, 2, 97. “all adoration,” As V, 2, 102 sq. “all tears,” Hml. I, 2, 149. “he's all the mother's,” R3 III, 1, 156. “all wet,” Ven. 83. “all unpossible,” R2 II, 2, 126. “all dedicated to closeness,” Tp. I, 2, 89. “all wound with adders,” II, 1, 13. “all humbled,” Gentl. I, 2, 59. “all enraged” II, 6, 38. “all armed,” Mids. II, 1, 157. “all with weary task foredone,” V, 381. “all unwarily,” John V, 7, 63. “dashed all to pieces,” Tp. I, 2, 8. Oth. III, 3, 431. “dispossess her all,” Tim. I, 1, 139. “all afire with me,” Tp. I, 2, 212. “all in buff,” Err. IV, 2, 36. “one all of luxury,” Meas. V, 506. “all in post,” H6C V, 5, 84. “all at one side,” Oth. IV, 3, 32. of all one pain (quite the same p.) R3 IV, 4, 303. “all alone,” Sonn. 29, 2. 124, 11. As II, 7, 136. Hml. I, 5, 102. Ant. I, 1, 52. “blister you all o'er,” Tp. I, 2, 324. “all as mad as he,” Err. V, 141. “all as soon as I,” John II, 59. V, 2, 170. Cor. I, 9, 44. Lr. IV, 7, 42.
b) serving only to enforce the expression: “all in war with time,” Sonn. 15, 13. “all for want of pruning,” Err. II, 2, 181. “when all aloud the wind doth blow,” LLL V, 2, 931. what occasion hath all so long detained “you,” Shr. III, 2, 105. “all at once,” H5 I, 1, 36. “not all so much for love,” R3 I, 1, 157. “all headlong,” Tit. V, 3, 132. “lay thee all along,” Rom. V, 3, 3. “stand all aloof,” V, 3, 26. “all but now,” Oth. II, 3, 179. “all too timeless,” Lucr. 44. “all too late,” Lucr. 44 “all too short,” Sonn. 18, 4. “all too near,” 61, 14. “all too precious,” 86, 2. “all too much,” Gentl. III, 1, 162. “all too wanton,” John III, 3, 36. “all too base,” R2 IV, 1, 28. “all too heavy,” H4B V, 2, 24. “all too dear,” Oth. II, 3, 94. “all too soon,” Cymb. V, 5, 169.
The following passages may be interpreted otherwise: “the marbled mansion all above,” Tim. IV, 3, 191 (== all the marbled mansion above). “down from the waist they are Centaurs, though women all above,” Lr. IV, 6, 127. “things outward do draw the inward quality after them, to suffer all alike,” Ant. III, 13, 34.
c) == although: “thy head, all indirectly, gave direction,” R3 IV, 4, 225. Perhaps also: “his horse is slain, and all on foot he fights” R3 V, 4, 4. But cf. “went all afoot in summer's scalding heat,” H6C V, 7, 18.
d) It is with hesitation that we advance the opinion that, like the German all in popular language, it is sometimes used for already: “Methinks I see this hurly all on foot,” John III, 4, 169. “but tell me not, for I have heard it all,” Rom. I, 1, 181. “she could have run and waddled all about,” I, 3, 37.
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