previous next
Bind (impf. and partic. bound, but bounden in As I, 2, 298 and John III, 3, 29), 1) to fasten or restrain by a tie: “he will not in her arms be bound,” Ven. 226. Lucr. 1501. “they must be bound,” Err. IV, 4, 97. Err. IV, 4, 97 V, 145. Ado IV, 2, 67. V, 1, 233. LLL III, 126. Rom. I, 2, 55 etc. Absolutely: “fast b., fast find,” Merch. II, 5, 54. Followed by to: “those fair arms which bound him to her breast,” Ven. 812. Err. I, 1, 82. John IV, 1, 4. H6A I, 1, 22. Tit. II, 1, 16 etc. To b. in == to confine: “cribbed, confined, bound in to doubts and fears,” Mcb. III, 4, 24. to b. up == to paralyze, to restrain: “my spirits are all bound up,” Tp. I, 2, 486. “when poisoned hours had bound me up from mine own knowledge,” Ant. II, 2, 90.
2) to tie, to confine with any ligature: “they that reap must sheaf and b.” As III, 2, 113. “the packet is not come where that and other specialties are bound,” LLL II, 165. I'll b. it (the wounded leg) “with my shirt,” Oth. V, 1, 73. let me but b. it (your forehead) “hard,” III, 3, 286. “bound with victorious wreaths,” R3 I, 1, 5. “bound with triumphant garlands,” IV, 4, 333. “his brows bound with oak,” Cor. I, 3, 16. “bound with laurel boughs,” Tit. I, 74. Used of books (== to put in a cover): “I'll have them fairly bound,” Shr. I, 2, 147. Rom. III, 2, 84.
To bind up, in the same sense: “having bound up the threatening twigs,” Meas. I, 3, 24. “to b. him up a rod,” Ado II, 1, 226 (Ff “to b. him a rod). to b. our loves up in a holy band,” III, 1, 114. “b. up those tresses,” John III, 4, 61. John III, 4, 61 “b. up yon dangling apricocks,” R2 III, 4, 29. -- “bound up his wound,” As IV, 3, 151. R3 V, 3, 177. And figuratively: “b. up the petty difference,” Ant. II, 1, 48. -- “to see his work so noble vilely bound up,” Wint. IV, 4, 22.
To b. in == to enclose, surround: “bound in with the triumphant sea,” R2 II, 1, 61. R2 II, 1, 61 “a hoop of gold to b. thy brothers in,” H4B IV, 4, 43. “a costly jewel, bound in with diamonds,” H6B III, 2, 107.
3) to knit: “b. this knot of amity,” H6A V, 1, 16.
4) to oblige, to engage; a) to engage by a legal tie, to pawn, to pledge, to mortgage: “he learned but surety-like to write for me under that bond that him as fast doth b.” Sonn. 134, 8. “in surety of the which one part of Aquitaine is bound to us,” LLL II, 136. “for the which Antonio shall be bound,” Merch. I, 3, 5. Merch. I, 3, 5 Merch. I, 3, 5 V, 137. “bound to himself! what doth he with a bond that he is bound to?” R2 V, 2, 67. “Montague is bound as well as I,” Rom. I, 2, 1.
To b. to one == to engage in the service of one: my duty is bound to your lordship, Lucr. Ded. Rom. I, 2, 1 “bound to her imposition,” Lucr. 1697. “how much in duty I am bound to both,” H6A II, 1, 37. “so shall you b. me to your highness' service,” H6C III, 2, 43. “the fragments of her faith are bound to Diomed,” Troil. V, 2, 160. “nature, to thy law my services are bound,” Lr. I, 2, 2. “he's bound unto Octavia,” Ant. II, 5, 58. “time hath rooted out my parentage and to the world and awkward casualties bound me in servitude,” Per. V, 1, 95. The partic. without to: “bound servants, steal!” Tim. IV, 1, 10. “with all bound humbleness,” All's II, 1, 117.
b) to engage, to tie by any other obligation, especially a moral one: “to b. him to remember my good will,” Gentl. IV, 4, 103. “to b. me, or undo me,” Ado IV, 4, 20. “it most of all these reasons --eth us, in our opinions she should be preferred,” H6A V, 5, 60. “your lordship ever binds him,” Tim. I, 1, 104. “in which I b., on pain of punishment, the world to weet we stand up peerless,” Ant. I, 1, 38. Absolutely: “marriage --s,” As V, 4, 59. Very frequent is the partic. bound == obliged: “bound by my charity and blest order, I come,” Meas. II, 3, 3; “I am bound by oath,” R3 IV, 1, 28. mostly followed by to and an infin.: “by law of nature thou art bound to breed,” Ven. 171. Sonn. 58, 4. Meas. IV, 3, 100. Err. V, 305. LLL IV, 1, 56. Merch. IV, 1, 65. Shr. V, 2, 164. John III, 1, 65. Lr. III, 7, 8. Ant. II, 6, 124. Cymb. I, 6, 81 etc. “I will be bound to pay it,” Merch. IV, 1, 211. “I dare be bound again, that your lord will never more break faith,” V, 251. “I dare be bound he's true,” Cymb. IV, 3, 18. how can we for our country pray, whereto (viz to pray for our country) “we are bound, together with thy victory, whereto we are bound?” Cor. V, 3, 108. -- Followed by to and a noun: “to plainness honour is bound,” Lr. I, 1, 150. -- Followed by against: “how much I could despise this man, but that I am bound in charity against it,” H8 III, 2, 298.
Bound to one == obliged to one, owing him gratitude: “so shall I evermore be bound to thee,” Wiv. IV, 6, 54. Meas. IV, 1, 25. LLL I, 2, 156. Merch. IV, 1, 407. V, 135. Wint. IV, 4, 575. H4B III, 2, 181. H6A II, 4, 128. H8 I, 2, 112. III, 2, 165. V, 3, 114 “(bound to heaven in daily thanks).” Cor. V, 3, 159. Rom. IV, 2, 32 etc. “Bound to one for sth.:” As I, 1, 16. Tw. III, 4, 297. Oth. I, 3, 182. -- “Bounden:” As I, 2, 298 and John III, 3, 29. For bound == prepared, ready (as perhaps also in Meas. III, 2, 167. John II, 522. H6C II, 4, 3. Hml. I, 5, 6. Lr. III, 7, 11. Cymb. I, 6, 81) see the article Bound.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: