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Bird, 1) a feathered flying animal: Ven. 67. Ven. 67 Ven. 67 Ven. 67 Lucr. 88. Lucr. 88 Lucr. 88 Lucr. 88 Lucr. 88 Sonn. 73, 4. 97, 12. 113, 6. Pilgr. 282. Pilgr. 282 Wiv. III, 1, 18. Ado II, 1, 230. LLL I, 1, 103. V, 2, 933. Mids. III, 1, 138. V, 401. Merch. III, 1, 32. As II, 5, 4. H6B II, 1, 8 etc. etc. “birds of prey,” Meas. II, 1, 2. enticing --s == decoy-birds, H6B I, 3, 92. b. of night == owl, Caes. I, 3, 26. the Arabian b. (Phoenix) Cymb. I, 6, 17. the rod and b. of peace (i. e. the dove) H8 IV, 1, 89. “I heard a b. so sing,” H4B V, 5, 113. Allusion to the proverb “''tis a bad b. that fouls its own nest',” As IV, 1, 208; to the proverb “'birds of a feather flock together':” H6C II, 1, 170. III, 3, 161.
2) the young of any fowl: “as that ungentle gull, the cuckoo's b., useth the sparrow,” H4A V, 1, 60. “if thou be that princely eagle's b.” H6C II, 1, 91. “ravens foster forlorn children, the whilst their own --s famish in their nests,” Tit. II, 3, 154.
3) used as a term of endearment: “this was well done, my b.” Tp. IV, 184. “am I your b.? I mean to shift my bush,” Shr. V, 2, 46. “I would I were thy b.” Rom. II, 2, 183. “come, b., come,” Hml. I, 5, 116. “the b. is dead that we have made so much on,” Cymb. IV, 2, 197.
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