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Break, vb., impf. “brake:” Ven. 469. Err. V, 48. H4A I, 1, 48. R3 III, 7, 41. Usually “broke:” Wiv. I, 1, 125. I, 4, 161. Err. V, 149. Ado III, 5, 42. LLL III, 118. As I, 2, 135. II, 4, 47. Tw. V, 188 etc. etc. Partic. broke (never adjectively before a noun), f. i. Sonn. 143, 2. 152, 3. Pilgr. 32. Pilgr. 32 Tp. III, 1, 37. IV, 99. Wiv. I, 1, 115. Meas. II, 4, 126. V, 218. Err. I, 2, 50. V, 169. Ado II, 1, 310. V, 1, 139. LLL V, 2, 440 etc. Or “broken:” Lucr. 1758. Sonn. 61, 3. Compl. 254. Pilgr. 40. Pilgr. 40 Gentl. II, 5, 19. II, 6, 11. Ado II, 3, 245. LLL III, 71. As I, 1, 134. I, 2, 150.*II, 1, 57. III, 5, 102. IV, 3, 155 etc. etc.
I) trans. 1) to rend apart, to crack: “--eth his rein,” Ven. 264. “his girths,” Ven. 264 “broken glass,” Lucr. 1758. Pilgr. 172. “--ing rings a-twain,” Compl. 6. --ing their contents (i. e. tearing the papers), Compl. 6 “b. her virgin-knot,” Tp. IV, 1, 15. “has broke his arrows,” Tp. IV, 1, 15 “I'll b. my staff,” V, 54. “the seal,” Gentl. III, 1, 139. “broke bread,” Wiv. I, 4, 161 and Ado III, 5, 42. Meas. II, 4, 126. Err. II, 2, 140. IV, 3, 31. Ado V, 1, 139. Ado V, 1, 139 As I, 2, 135. II, 4, 47. III, 5, 102. Shr. I, 2, 267 “(b. the ice).” II, 149. III, 2, 48. Wint. III, 2, 130. R2 II, 2, 59. II, 3, 27. H4A II, 4, 238. H6B I, 2, 26. H6B I, 2, 26 IV, 1, 42. H6C V, 4, 4. R3 V, 3, 341. Cor. I, 1, 210 etc. to b. one's back == to strain or dislocate it with too heavy a burden: Tp. III, 1, 26. H6B IV, 8, 30. H8 I, 1, 84. she broke her brow == bruized her forehead, Rom. I, 3, 38. to b. the head == to crack the skin of the head, so that the blood comes: Wiv. I, 1, 125. Tw. V, 178. Tw. V, 178 H4A III, 1, 242. H4B II, 1, 97. III, 2, 33. H5 III, 2, 42. “to b. the pate:” Err. II, 1, 78. II, 2, 220. III, 1, 74. All's II, 1, 68. “the sconce:” Err. I, 2, 79. “the costard:” LLL III, 71. “broken limb,” As I, 1, 134. I, 2, 150. H4B IV, 1, 222. Tit. V, 3, 72. “b. your necks,” H6A V, 4, 91. “b. my shin,” LLL III, 118. Rom. I, 2, 53. “we b. the sinews of our plot,” Tw. II, 5, 83. -- To b. a lance == to enter the lists: H6A III, 2, 50.
Metaphorically: to b. the heart == to kill with grief: Lucr. 1239. Compl. 254 “(the broken bosoms).” Cor. I, 1, 215. Lr. III, 4, 4 etc. == to die: “they will b. their hearts but they will effect,” Wiv. II, 2, 323. “almost broke my heart with extreme laughter,” Tit. V, 1, 113. -- “My charms I'll b.,” Tp. V, 31 (expression taken from the magic wand). “her sobs do her intendments b.” Ven. 222. “the unity had not been broken,” R3 IV, 4, 380. cf. H4B IV, 5, 69.
2) to shatter in pieces, to batter down: “our windows are broke down in every street,” H6A III, 1, 84. “hunger broke stone walls,” Cor. I, 1, 210. 4, 16. “the doors are broke,” Hml. IV, 5, 111. == to disperse, in speaking of a misty vapour: Pilgr. 40.
3) to burst through, to open by violence: “her brother's ghost his paved bed would b.” Meas. V, 440. “he --s the pale,” Err. II, 1, 100. “to b. his grave,” Wint. V, 1, 42. “how has the ass broke the wall,” Tim. IV, 3, 354. “the mad mothers with their howls do b. the clouds,” H5 III, 3, 40. Used of an army: “all our ranks are broke,” H5 IV, 5, 6. H6C II, 3, 10. “the army broken,” Cymb. V, 3, 5. -- Joined with ope and up: “--s ope her locked-up eyes,” Lucr. 446. “broke open my lodge,” Wiv. I, 1, 115. Err. III, 1, 73. Cor. III, 1, 138. “b. up the seals,” Wint. III, 2, 132. “b. up the gates,” H6A I, 3, 13. “ghosts b. up their graves,” H6B I, 4, 22. b. up this (sc. a letter), Merch. II. 4, 10. To b. up, in the sense of to carve: Boyet, you can carve; b. up this capon (sc. a letter), LLL IV, 1, 56 (cf. the French poulet == love-letter).
4) to open, to make a disclosure of: “b. thy mind to me,” H5 V, 2, 265. “we shall meet, and b. our minds at large,” H6A I, 3, 81. “b. a word with you,” Err. III, 1, 75. “b. this enterprise to me,” Mcb. I, 7, 48. “b. the cause of our expedience to the queen,” Ant. I, 2, 184. “the --ing of so great a thing,” V, 1, 14. -- As in Shr. I, 2, 267, to break the ice is == to open the matter, to pave the way, so in Wiv. III, 4, 22 b. their talk == open their conversation (cf. Troil. III, 3, 215).
5) to interrupt: “b. the parle,” Tit. V, 3, 19. “you have now a broken banquet,” H8 I, 4, 61 (with a double sense). “you have broke it,” Troil. III, 1, 53. “a tearing groan did b. the name of Antony,” Ant. IV, 14, 31 (cut it in two). to b. a person's sleep == to keep one waking, and to be waking: “my slumbers should be broken,” Sonn. 61, 3. “have broke their sleep with thoughts,” H4B IV, 5, 69. Cor. IV, 4, 19. “b. not your sleeps for that,” Hml. IV, 7, 30 (don't be uneasy).
To b. off == to discontinue, to leave off, to cut short: “brake off his late intent,” Ven. 469. “b. off thy song,” Meas. IV, 1, 7. “which was broke off,” V, 218. “b. off your conference,” John II, 150. “b. the story off,” R2 V, 2, 2. “brake off our business,” H4A I, 1, 48. H5 I, 1, 90. H6C II, 2, 110. R3 III, 1, 177. “with patience calm the storm, while we bethink a means to b. it off,” H6C III, 3, 39, i. e. to make it cease.
To b. up == to dismiss, to adjourn: “like a school broke up,” H4B IV, 2, 104. “b. up the court,” H8 II, 4, 240. “b. up the senate till another time,” Caes. II, 2, 98. “b. we our watch up,” Hml. I, 1, 168.
6) to violate, to infringe, not to keep: “b. an article,” LLL I, 1, 134. “your bidding,” All's II, 5, 93. “a compact,” H6A V, 4, 164. “custom,” Merch. I, 3, 65. “his day,” Merch. I, 3, 165. “faith,” Merch. V, 253. “honesty,” Wint. I, 2, 288. John V, 2, 8. H6C IV, 4, 30. R3 IV, 4, 386. to b. one's fast, a) == to eat meat in the time of fasting: John I, 235; b) == to breakfast: Gentl. II, 4, 141. Err. I, 2, 50. H6C II, 2, 127. “a hest,” Tp. III, 1, 37. “hours,” Gentl. V, 1, 4. “a law,” R3 I, 4, 205. R3 I, 4, 205 “an oath,” Sonn. 152, 6. Gentl. IV, 4, 135. LLL I, 1, 66. V, 2, 355. V, 2, 355 R2 IV, 214. H6C I, 2, 16. I, 4, 100. II, 2, 89. III, 1, 79. “the peace,” Ado II, 3, 202. H6A I, 3, 58. “the possession of a royal bed,” R2 III, 1, 15. “promise,” As IV, 3, 155. “sanctuary,” R3 III, 1, 47. “seasons,” R3 I, 4, 76. “time,” All's II, 1, 190. R2 V, 5, 43. “troth,” LLL I, 1, 66. V, 2, 350. “truth,” Sonn. 41, 12. “vows,” Sonn. 152, 3. Pilgr. 32. Pilgr. 32 Pilgr. 32 Gentl. II, 6, 11. Mids. I, 1, 175. Ant. I, 3, 31 “(those mouthmade vows, which b. themselves in swearing). one's word,” Err. III, 1, 76. H4B II, 3, 10.
The person, to whom a vow or promise is not kept, adjoined with the prepos. to: “all oaths that are broke to me,” R2 IV, 214; or with the prepos. with: “--ing faith with Julia,” Gentl. IV, 2, 11. “make him with fair Aegle b. his faith,” Mids. II, 1, 79. “b. an oath with thee,” Merch. V, 248. “to b. promise with him,” Tw. II, 3, 137. “hath with Talbot broke his word,” H6A IV, 6, 2. “hast thou broken faith with me,” H6B V, 1, 91. “b. an oath with him,” R3 IV, 4, 378 (Qq by him). And without an object: “I would not b. with her,” Wiv. III, 2, 57, i. e. I would not b. my word to her. cf. Merch. I, 3, 137.
7) to crush, to weaken, to impair: “an old man, broken with the storms of state,” H8 IV, 2, 21. I shall b. my wind == be out of breath, H4A II, 2, 13. “pursy insolence shall b. his wind with fear and horrid flight,” Tim. V, 4, 12. “floods of tears will drown my oratory, and b. my very utterance,” Tit. V, 3, 91. “is not your voice broken?” H4B I, 2, 206. a broken voice (i. e. trembling with emotion) Hml. II, 2, 582. “and kissing speaks, with lustful language broken,” Ven. 47, i. e. trembling with lustful desire.
Hence == to tame, to make docile: “thou canst not b. her to the lute,” Shr. II, 148. “thou wantest --ing,” Err. III, 1, 77.
8) to b. a jest == to crack a joke: “you b. jests as braggarts do their blades,” Ado V, 1, 189. “to b. a jest upon the company,” Shr. IV, 5, 72. “--s scurrile jests,” Troil. I, 3, 148. And similarly: “he'll but b. a comparison or two on me,” Ado II, 1, 152. “I may have some odd quirks and remnants of wit broken on me,” II, 3, 245.
9) Peculiar uses: “a poor earl's daughter is unequal odds, and therefore may be broke without offence,” H6A V, 5, 35, == broken with; the omission of with being perhaps caused by the following “without. Hell itself --s out contagion to this world,” Hml. III, 2, 407, == vomits forth, quite like the German ausbrechen; but Ff. and M. Edd. have breathes out. So he b. it (his word) “not behind,” Err. III, 1, 76 (== break wind). “Break any breaking here,” Err. III, 1, 74.
10) The partic. broken in different significations easily explained by what precedes: a broken mouth == a mouth with gaps in its teeth, All's II, 3, 66. broken meats == meats half eaten, remnants of victuals: Lr. II, 2, 15. cf. “a broken banquet,” H8 I, 4, 61. “broken tears,” Troil. IV, 4, 50, i. e. tears breaking forth. “I make a broken delivery of the business,” Wint. V, 2, 10, i. e. a fragmentary report, having many gaps in it. “In broken English,” H5 V, 2, 264. 265; in a language consisting only half of English. Broken music == music on stringed instruments ("the term originating probably from harps, lutes, and such other stringed instruments as were played without a bow, not having the capability to sustain a long note to its full duration of time." Chappell): “this broken music in his sides,” As I, 2, 150.*“your answer in broken music,” H5 V, 2, 263. “here is good broken music,” Troil. III, 1, 52.
II) intrans. 1) to part in two, to burst, to open: “the berry --s before it staineth,” Ven. 460. “have a care the honeybag b. not,” Mids. IV, 1, 16. if one (point) “b.” Tw. I, 5, 26. “my girdle b.” H4A III, 3, 171. “b. thou in pieces,” H6A V, 4, 92. “like a glass did b. in the rinsing,” H8 I, 1, 167. my high-blown pride broke under me (like a bladder) III, 2, 362. “whereagainst my grained ash an hundred times hath broke,” Cor. IV, 5, 114. “the impostume that inward --s,” Hml. IV, 4, 28; cf. and when it --s, I fear will issue thence the foul corruption etc. John IV, 2, 80. “the army --ing, my husband hies him home,” All's IV, 4, 11, i. e. disbanding.
Used of the heart and heart-strings: Ven. 336. Lucr. 1716. Compl. 275. Shr. IV, 3, 78. Wint. III, 2, 175. R2 II, I, 228. H6B III, 2, 320. H6C II, 5, 78. R3 IV, 4, 365. Tit. III, 1, 60. Rom. III, 2, 57. Absolutely: “O b., o b.!” Ant. V, 2, 313.
“Flaky darkness --s within the east,” R3 V, 3, 86, == dissolves, disperses. And hence, in the same sense, applied to the contrary: the day, or “the morning --s,” John V, 4, 32. H5 IV, 1, 88. H6B II, 2, 1. Rom. III, 5, 40. Caes. II, 1, 101. Oth. III, 1, 34.
2) to burst, to discharge itself: “his passion is so ripe, it needs must b.” John IV, 2, 79. “b. into extremity of rage,” Err. V, 48. “b. into some merry passion,” Shr. Ind. 1, 97. “to b. into this dangerous argument,” John IV, 2, 54. “sin gathering head will b. into corruption,” R2 V, 1, 59. “to b. into this woman's mood,” H4A I, 3, 237. “broke into a general prophecy,” H8 I, 1, 91. “do not b. into these deep extremes,” Tit. III, 1, 216. “from ancient grudge broke to new mutiny,” Rom. I Chor. Rom. I Chor. To b. forth: “his malice 'gainst the lady will suddenly b. forth,” As I, 2, 295. “diseased nature --s forth in strange eruptions,” H4A III, 1, 27. “--ing forth in riots,” Lr. I, 4, 222. “your letters did withhold our --ing forth,” Ant. III, 6, 79. To b. out: “b. out into tears,” Ado I, 1, 24. “such --ing out of mirth,” LLL V, 1, 121. “b. out into a second course of mischief,” H5 IV, 3, 106. “into a flame,” H6A III, 1, 191. “into terms of rage,” H6C I, 1, 265. “lest the new healed wound of malice should b. out,” R3 II, 2, 125. “you will b. out,” Troil. V, 2, 51. “b. out to bitterest enmity,” Cor. IV, 4, 17. “mature for the violent --ing out,” IV, 3, 27. “--s out to savage madness,” Oth. IV, 1, 56. “might b. out and swear,” Cymb. IV, 2, 140. Hence == to take rise: “such a deal of wonder is broken out within this hour,” Wint. V, 2, 26. “lest parties b. out,” Cor. III, 1, 315. “this will b. out to all our sorrows,” John IV, 2, 101 (turn to our sorrow).
3) to force one's way: “to break in,” Err. III, 1, 80. Err. III, 1, 80 H6A I, 1, 119. II, 1, 71. H6B III, 2, 278. H6C I, 1, 8. H6C I, 1, 8 “b. into his son-in-law's house,” H6B IV, 7, 117. IV, 10, 35. “b. within the bloody house of life,” John IV, 2, 210. “broke out to acquaint you with this evil,” John V, 6, 24. “life looks through and will b. out,” H4B IV, 4, 120. “--s like a fire out of his keeper's arms,” H4B I, 1, 142. “within this mile b. forth a hundred springs,” Tim. IV, 3, 421. “break loose,” Err. V, 169. Mids. III, 2, 258. H4B I, 1, 10. “I must from this enchanting queen b. off,” Ant. I, 2, 132. “one of her feathered creatures broke away,” Sonn. 143, 2. “I will not b. away,” Err. IV, 4, 1. “b. among the press,” H8 V, 4, 88. “love --s through,” Ven. 576. “through the floodgates --s the silver rain,” Ven. 576 Sonn. 34, 5. Shr. IV, 3, 175. H4A I, 2, 226. H6B IV, 8, 24. Rom. II, 2, 2. “he --eth from the sweet embrace,” Ven. 811. Ven. 811 “on what occasion b. those tears from thee?” Lucr. 1270. “would not b. from thence,” Compl. 34. Err. V, 149. As II, 4, 40. R2 II, 1, 281. H6A I, 4, 44. H6C II, 1, 75. R3 I, 4, 9. “tears which b. from me perforce,” Lr. I, 4, 320. “wherefore --s that sigh from the inward of thee?” Cymb. III, 4, 5. And without the idea of violence, == to escape, to come from, to quit: “anon did this b. from her,” Wint. III, 3, 27. “any accent --ing from thy tongue,” John V, 6, 14. “you have broken from his liking,” Wint. V, 1, 212 (have acted against his will).
4) to fall to pieces, to lose strength or validity: “all bond and privilege of nature, b.!” Cor. V, 3, 25. “no bargains b. that are not this day made,” John III, 1, 93. “midst the sentence so her accent --s, that twice she doth begin ere once she speaks,” Lucr. 566 (The passage in Ant. V, 1, 14 may be taken in this sense as well as in that of opening, communicating).
Especially == to become bankrupt: “he cannot choose but b.” Merch. III, 1, 120. “broken bankrupt,” As II, 1, 57. R2 II, 1, 257. H4B V, 5, 128. Rom. III, 2, 57. Tim. IV, 2, 5. V, 1, 10. Cymb. V, 4, 19.
5) to fall out: “are they broken?” Gentl. II, 5, 19. “it cannot be the Volsces dare b. with us,” Cor. IV, 6, 48. With a quibble: “the broken rancour of your high-swoln hearts, but lately splintered . . . .,” R3 II, 2, 117.
6) to open, to make a disclosure; with to or with before the person, and of or about before the thing: “then after to her father will I b.” Ado I, 1, 328. “now will we b. with him,” Gentl. I, 3, 44. “I will b. with her,” Ado I, 1, 311. “I have broke with her father,” II, 1, 310. “have broken with the king,” H8 V, 1, 47. “let us not b. with him,” Caes. II, 1, 150. “I am to b. with thee of some affairs,” Gentl. III, 1, 59. “and instantly b. with you of it,” Ado I, 2, 16. “I faintly broke with thee of Arthur's death,” John IV, 2, 227. “b. with your wives of your departure,” H4A III, 1, 144. “to b. with him about it,” Ado II, 1, 162. “to b. with him about Beatrice,” III, 2, 76.
7) to spread by dashing, as waves: their (the waves') “ranks began to b. upon the galled shore,” Lucr. 1440. “the --ing gulf,” Err. II, 2, 128. “on the --ing seas,” R2 III, 2, 3.
8) to b. off == to discontinue to speak: “do not b. off so,” Err. I, 1, 97. Mids. V, 98. John IV, 2, 235. H6B II, 2, 77. III, 1, 325. R3 III, 7, 41. Caes. II, 1, 116. Hml. I, 1, 40. Lr. V, 2, 262.
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