previous next
Breed, vb. (impf. and partic. bred), I) trans., 1) to beget; properly and figuratively (== to produce, to cause): “which bred more beauty in his angry eyes,” Ven. 70. “thing like a man, but of no woman bred,” Ven. 70 Ven. 70 Ven. 70 Ven. 70 Ven. 70 Lucr. 411. Lucr. 411 Lucr. 411 Lucr. 411 Lucr. 411 Lucr. 411 Lucr. 411 “to b. another thee,” Sonn. 6, 7. 108, 13. 111, 4. Gentl. V, 4, 1. Ado III, 1, 11. LLL I, 2, 106. Merch. III, 2, 63. Merch. III, 2, 63 All's I, 1, 154. I, 3, 151. Tw. III, 4, 207. Wint. V, 1, 12 “(the sweetest companion that e'er man bred his hopes out of).” John I, 124 “(this calf bred from his cow).” H4A I, 1, 11. H4B IV, 2, 74 “(to b. this present peace).” H6A I, 2, 30 (O. Edd. breed, M. Edd. “bred).” III, 3, 11. IV, 1, 193. V, 5, 4. H6B I, 3, 210. H6C II, 2, 121 “(the wound that bred this meeting).” H6C II, 2, 121 III, 3, 68. R3 I, 4, 110. IV, 4, 424. H8 I, 1, 182. Tit. II, 3, 146 “(every mother --s not sons alike).” V, 3, 62. Rom. I, 1, 96. Caes. V, 3, 101. Mcb. III, 4, 30. Oth. III, 4, 73 “(the worms that did b. the silk).” Ant. II, 7, 29. Cymb. IV, 2, 35. -- Reflectively: “that policy may b. itself so out of circumstance,” Oth. III, 3, 16 (may find origin and food in accidents).
Well bred == of good extraction: “a gentleman well bred and of good name,” H4B I, 1, 26. true bred == genuine: V, 3, 71. “my hounds are bred out of the Spartan kind,” Mids. IV, 1, 124. “she is not bred so dull but she can learn,” Merch. III, 2, 164 (so stupid by nature). “the dainties that are bred in a book,” LLL IV, 2, 25 (Nathaniel's speech). Bred out == degenerated: “our mettle is bred out,” H5 III, 5, 29. “the strain of man's bred out into baboon and monkey,” Tim. I, 1, 259.
2) to bring up: a Bohemian born, but here “nursed up and bred,” Meas. IV, 2, 135. Merch. II, 1, 3. As I, 1, 4. As I, 1, 4 As I, 1, 4 II, 7, 96. IV, 1, 179. Tw. I, 2, 22. Lr. I, 1, 98. Cymb. I, 1, 42. Cymb. I, 1, 42 Often == to keep, to feed: “his horses are bred better,” As I, 1, 11. “a servant that he bred,” Lr. IV, 2, 73. “one bred of alms and fostered with cold dishes,” Cymb. II, 3, 119. “must I be unfolded with one that I have bred?” Ant. V, 2, 171. “which may both b. thee and still rest thine,” Wint. III, 3, 48 (furnish thee with the means of education). “you are so strongly in my purpose bred that all the world besides methinks are dead,” Sonn. 112, 13 (so kept and harboured in my thoughts).
II) intr., 1) to beget children, to pair, to be fruitful: “by law of nature thou art bound to b.” Ven. 171. “a --ing jennet,” Ven. 171 “my ewes b. not,” Pilgr. 246. “the spring is near when green geese are a breeding,” LLL I, 1, 97. “would not a pair of these have bred?” Tw. III, 1, 55. “desire to b. by me,” Wint. IV, 4, 103. “O blessed --ing sun,” Tim. IV, 3, 1. “the earth feeds and --s by a composture,” IV, 3, 444. Used of money bringing interest: “I make it b. as fast,” Merch. I, 3, 97. Figuratively: “'tis such sense, that my sense --s with it,” Meas. II, 2, 142 (i. e. many thoughts are awakened by it in me). “there is no measure in the occasion that --s, therefore the sadness is without limit,” Ado I, 3, 4.
2) to be produced, to have birth: “here never shines the sun, here nothing --s unless the nightly owl or fatal raven,” Tit. II, 3, 96. “where they most b. and haunt, the air is delicate,” Mcb. I, 6, 9. Tropically, == to grow, to arise, to develop itself: “advice is sporting while infection --s,” Lucr. 907. “heavens rain grace on that which --s between them,” Tp. III, 1, 76. “thereof the raging fire of fever bred,” Err. V, 75. “what may chance or b. upon our absence,” Wint. I, 2, 12. “what is --ing that changeth thus his manners,” Wint. I, 2, 12 “what better matter --s for you,” John III, 4, 170. “so will this base and envious discord b.” H6A III, 1, 194. “see what --s about her heart,” Lr. III, 6, 81. “much is --ing,” Ant. I, 2, 199.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: