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Cheer, vb., 1) trans. a) to make cheerful, to comfort, to encourage: “to c. the ploughman with increaseful crops,” Lucr. 958. Pilgr. 394. Err. III, 2, 26. H4B IV, 2, 9. H6A I, 4, 90. V, 2, 1. H6C I, 4, 77. II, 2, 4. II, 2, 4 II, 2, 4 V, 4, 65. R3 I, 3, 5. II, 2, 114. V, 3, 174. Troil. V, 3, 92. Tit. I, 457. IV, 4, 88. Rom. II, 3, 25. Ant. III, 6, 81. Cymb. III, 5, 67. this push will c. me ever, or disseat me now (Dyce chair; but there is no verb to chair in Sh.) Mcb. V, 3, 21. “be --ed,” Ant. V, 2, 184. “c. yon stranger, bid her welcome,” Merch. III, 2, 240. “c. your neighbours,” H8 I, 4, 41 (amuse them by sprightly conversation). -- Used of the influence of the sun: “he --s the morn,” Ven. 484. “--ed and checked even by the self-same sky,” Sonn. 15, 6. “all the world is --ed by the sun,” R3 I, 2, 129. “ere the sun advance his burning eye, the day to c.” Rom. II, 3, 6. To c. up, in the same sense: “--ing up her senses,” Ven. 896. “his drumming heart --s up his burning eye,” Lucr. 435. “--ed up the heavy time,” John IV, 1, 47. H5 IV, 6, 20. H6A I, 5, 16. H6C I, 1, 6. II, 1, 133. II, 2, 56. R3 V, 3, 71. Mcb. IV, 1, 127. Used reflectively: “c. thyself a little,” As II, 6, 5. “c. up yourself,” H4B IV, 4, 113.
b) to encourage, to incite: “and here's the heart that --s these hands to execute the like upon thyself,” H6C II, 4, 9. “and all the madness is, he --s them up too,” Tim. I, 2, 43. III, 5, 114.
c) to salute with sounds of joy: “a cry more tuneable was never holla'd to, nor --ed with horn,” Mids. IV, 1, 130.
2) intr. to be in a state or disposition, to fare: “how --est thou, Jessica?” Merch. III, 5, 75 (Qq farest).
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