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Come, to draw near, to approach, to arrive (forming its perfect with the verb to be): Tp. I, 2, 39. Tp. I, 2, 39 Tp. I, 2, 39 Tp. I, 2, 39 Tp. I, 2, 39 II, 2, 15. II, 2, 15 V, 36. Gentl. I, 1, 54. II, 4, 78. IV, 3, 9 etc. etc. “c. cut and long-tail,” Wiv. III, 4, 47. to c. and go, a) == to go to and fro, to go between: Gentl. III, 1, 142. Wiv. II, 2, 130. b) == to appear and disappear: “the colour of the king doth c. and go,” John IV, 2, 76. (blood) “--ing and going with thy honey breath,” Tit. II, 4, 25.
Having after it an infinitive without to: “we'll c. dress you straight,” Wiv. IV, 2, 84. c. go (let us go) Err. V, 114. H6A IV, 4, 40. Cymb. II, 1, 55. (M. Edd. “come, go). c. challenge me,” LLL V, 2, 815. “to c. view fair Portia,” Merch. II, 7, 43. “c. see,” As II, 4, 86. “c. buy,” Wint. IV, 4, 230. “to c. speak with me,” H4B I, 2, 151. “c. weep with me,” Rom. IV, 1, 45. “to c. seek you out,” Lr. III, 4, 157. “to bid Cassio c. speak with you,” Oth. III, 4, 50. Caes. III, 2, 237.
Used periphrastically, when followed by an inf. with to: “if there he came to lie, why, there Love lived,” Ven. 245. “when thou comest thy tale to tell, smooth not thy tongue with filed talk,” Pilgr. 305. “howe'er you c. to know it,” Mcb. IV, 1, 51. “ere we c. to fall,” Hml. III, 3, 49. “he never can meet more mischance than c. to be but named of thee,” Cymb. II, 3, 137. to c. to pass == to pass, to happen: Meas. II, 1, 256. Mids. III, 2, 33. IV, 1, 83. H8 I, 2, 63. Hml. II, 2, 437. to c. to be == to become: “how camest thou to be the siege of this moon-calf?” Tp. II, 2, 110. “if once he c. to be a cardinal,” H6A V, 1, 32.
Having after it the partic. pres.: “she came stealing,” Ven. 344. “they both came running,” H6A II, 2, 29.
Sometimes seemingly in a general sense == to move, to change place, to get, but always with the latent idea of an advantageous or disadvantageous effect or purpose: “what foul play had we that we came from thence?” Tp. I, 2, 60 (sc. to our misfortune). “how camest thou in this pickle?” V, 281. “how came my man i the stocks?” Lr. II, 4, 201. “how came we ashore?” Tp. I, 2, 158 (sc. fortunately). c. from thy ward, 471 (sc. and yield to me). “I'll c. no more i' the basket,” Wiv. IV, 2, 50 (sc. as you wish me to do). “O, to him, to him, wench! he will relent; he's --ing, I perceive it,” Meas. II, 2, 125 (== he is about to yield). “the wind is c. about,” Merch. II, 6, 64. “to c. behind folks,” H6B IV, 7, 88 (to attack them). “shall I c. upon thee with an old saying . . .,” LLL IV, 1, 121. (cf. “and c. you now with 'knocking at the gate'?” Shr. I, 2, 42.) “I was bid to c. for you,” As I, 2, 64. “and even here I brake off and came away,” R3 III, 7, 41; cf. Cor. I, 6, 13 and Caes. I, 2, 279. “Troilus will not c. far behind him,” Troil. I, 2, 59. “c. off and on swifter than . . .,” H4B III, 2, 281 (sc. to the delight of the spectator). “and over and over he --s, and up again,” Cor. I, 3, 68. “to c. in further evil,” Hml. V, 2, 69. “this villain of mine --s under the prediction,” Lr. I, 2, 119 (i. e. to my grief).
Hence, metaphorically == to happen, to fall out, to a person's advantage or disadvantage: “dolour --s to him,” Tp. II, 1, 19. “thou seest what's c. upon thee,” Meas. II, 1, 99. “the danger that might c.” IV, 3, 89. “to write and read --s by nature,” Ado III, 3, 16. “c. what will,” LLL V, 2, 112; cf. H4A I, 2, 162. “marriage --s by destiny,” All's I, 3, 66. “all the titles of good fellowship c. to you,” H4A II, 4, 308. “so c. to you and yours as to this prince,” H6C V, 5, 82. “the subjects' grief --s through commissions,” H8 I, 2, 57. “through our intercession this pardon --s,” I, 2, 107. out of those many (benefits) “which, you say, live to c. in my behalf,” Troil. III, 3, 16. “to Coriolanus c. all joy,” Cor. II, 2, 158. “this unlooked for sport --s well,” Rom. I, 5, 31. “banishment! it --s not ill,” Tim. III, 5, 112. “c. what sorrow can,” Rom. II, 6, 3. “seek and know how this foul murder --s,” V, 3, 198. cf. “what's thy interest in this sad wreck? how came it?” Cymb. IV, 2, 366. “it --s in charity to thee,” Tim. I, 2, 229. “new honours c. upon him,” Mcb. I, 3, 144. “untimely --s this hurt,” Lr. III, 7, 98. what comfort to this great decay (sc. Lear) “may c..” V, 3, 297. “it will c., humanity must prey on itself,” IV, 2, 48. “or came it by request,” Oth. I, 3, 113. “how --s this trick upon him,” IV, 2, 129. cf. “how --s it such numbers seek for thee?” Lucr. 895. Meas. IV, 2, 136. V, 462. Err. II, 2, 121. Mids. IV, 1, 105. Wint. I, 2, 219. John II, 107. H4A V, 1, 27. H4B II, 1, 86. II, 2, 123. Cor. III, 1, 276. Tit. I, 392. Hml. II, 2, 352. Lr. II, 1, 6. “so --s it you have been mistook,” Tw. V, 266. “thus it came,” H8 II, 4, 169. “whereon it came that I was cast,” Oth. V, 2, 326.
Used of the approach of time: “all sins past and all that are to c.” Lucr. 923. Meas. II, 1, 175. Tw. II, 3, 50. H6A I, 2, 57. To c. == future: Sonn. 17, 1. Sonn. 17, 1 107, 2. Tp. II, 1, 253. Wiv. III, 4, 12. Meas. IV, 2, 152. IV, 4, 33. V, 427. V, 427 V, 427 Tw. V, 364. Wint. II, 3, 151. IV, 3, 31. IV, 4, 508. H4A I, 3, 171. H6B IV, 2, 138. V, 3, 31. R3 IV, 4, 387. V, 5, 33. Troil. I, 3, 346. II, 2, 202. III, 2, 180. Mcb. I, 7, 7. Cymb. V, 5, 213. Substantively: “past and to c. seems best,” H4B I, 3, 108. “that to c. shall all be done by the rule,” Ant. II, 3, 6 (that to c. == the future). Come == next, in the language of the vulgar: “c. Philip and Jacob,” Meas. III, 2, 214. “c. peascod time,” H4B II, 4, 413. “c. Lammas-eve,” Rom. I, 3, 17.* Coming == next: “this evening --ing,” Gentl. IV, 3, 42. “I fear we shall outsleep the --ing morn,” Mids. V, 372.
As to c. to be, so also to come alone == to become: “how c. you thus estranged?” LLL V, 2, 213. “how came her eyes so bright?” Mids. II, 2, 92. “how came the posterns so easily open?” Wint. II, 1, 52. “how came Falstaff's sword so hacked?” H4A II, 4, 335. “so came I a widow,” H4B II, 3, 57. how camest thou so (lame)? H6B II, 1, 96. “how came it cloven?” Troil. I, 2, 133. “how came he dead?” Hml. IV, 5, 130. “how came he mad?” V, 1, 171. “if you c. slack of former services,” Lr. I, 3, 9. “how came you thus recovered?” Oth. II, 3, 296. “--s deared by being lacked,” Ant. I, 4, 44. “how came it yours?” Cymb. V, 5, 138. “how he came dead,” Per. IV, 3, 29. “how she came placed here,” V, 3, 67.
In the imperative, frequently serving as an interjection, a) to invite to acting or speaking: “mistress Ford; c., mistress Ford --,” Wiv. II, 2, 59 (i. e. speak on, tell your tale). “ay, c., quick,” IV, 5, 44. “but c., your Bergomask,” Mids. V, 368. “c., the full stop,” Merch. III, 1, 17. “c., where is this young gallant?” As I, 2, 212. “c., shall we go and kill us venison?” II, 1, 21. “a better instance, I say, c.” III, 2, 59. “c., blow thy blast,” Cor. I, 4, 12. “your hands, c. then,” Hml. II, 2, 388. “draw, and c.” Ant. IV, 14, 84. b) or to express rebuke: “c., thou canst not hide it,” Wiv. III, 3, 70. “c., you are a tedious fool,” Meas. II, 1, 119. “c., sir, I know what I know,” III, 2, 161. “c., I will fasten on this sleeve of thine,” Err. II, 2, 175. “c., talk not of her,” Ado II, 1, 262. “nay, c. again, good Kate; I am a gentleman,” Shr. II, 219. “c., sir, you peevishly threw it to her,” Tw. II, 2, 14. “c., half all Cominius' honours are to Marcius,” Cor. I, 1, 276. “c., sermon me no further,” Tim. II, 2, 181 etc. etc. -- Iterated: “c., c., open the matter in brief,” Gentl. I, 1, 135. “c., fool, c., try me in thy paper,” III, 1, 299. “c., c., a hand from either,” V, 4, 116. “c., c., sans compliment, what news abroad?” John V, 6, 16. “c., Dromio, c.; these jests are out of season,” Err. I, 2, 68. “c., c., no longer will I be a fool” II, 2, 205. “c., c., you know I gave it you even now,” IV, 1, 55. “c., c., do you think I do not know you?” Ado II, 1, 126. “c., lady, c., you have lost the heart of Signior Benedick,” Ado II, 1, 126 “c., c., you're mocking,” Shr. I, 1, 132. All's II, 5, 78. Wint. IV, 4, 427. John V, 2, 60. H4A IV, 3, 16. R3 I, 3, 74. IV, 4, 284. H8 V, 3, 167. Troil. IV, 2, 29 etc. etc.
Followed by prepositions: 1) to c. by == to acquire, to get possession of: “as thou got'st Milan, I'll c. by Naples,” Tp. II, 1, 292. “every thing that he can c. by,” Gentl. III, 1, 125. “how camest thou by this ring?” V, 4, 96. “your heart cannot c. by her,” LLL III, 43. “how I caught it, found it, or came by it,” Merch. I, 1, 3. “superfluity --s sooner by white hairs,” I, 2, 9. Shr. I, 2, 14. IV, 1, 9. Tw. I, 5, 131. II, 5, 6. R2 III, 4, 80. H4B II, 1, 89. IV, 5, 219. R3 V, 3, 248. Tim. I, 1, 209. Caes. II, 1, 169. Caes. II, 1, 169 Mcb. V, 1, 25. Oth. V, 2, 319. Cymb. II, 4, 46. Cymb. II, 4, 46
2) to c. from == a) to be descended from: “--ing from a king,” Lucr. 1002. b) to proceed, to issue from: “if I perceive the love c. from her,” Ado II, 3, 234. “acquaint my daughter no further than --s from her demand,” Lr. I, 5, 3. Hence == to be spoken, uttered by: “this is unwonted which now came from him,” Tp. I, 2, 498. “I will set down what --s from her,” Mcb. V, 1, 37.
3) to c. of == a) to be descended from: “of what kind should this cock c.” As II, 7, 90. “--s of a very dull kindred,” III, 2, 32. “c. of the Bentivolii,” Shr. I, 1, 13. “you came not of one mother,” John I, 58. “thou camest not of the blood royal,” H4A I, 2, 156. “as ever you came of women,” H5 II, 1, 122. -- b) to be caused by, to be the result of: “thereof --s the proverb,” Gentl. III, 1, 305. “thereof --s that the wenches say,” Err. IV, 3, 53. V, 68. “of sufferance --s ease,” H4B V, 4, 28. “hereof --s it that . . .,” IV, 3, 127. “what would c. of it!” Caes. III, 2, 151. “nothing will c. of nothing,” Lr. I, 1, 92. I, 4, 312. “what's to c. of my despised time is nought but bitterness,” Oth. I, 1, 162. -- Similarly preceded by thence and “whence:” Sonn. 111, 5. Meas. I, 2, 128. H6A I, 4, 99.
4) to c. over: “said I came o'er his heart; and trow you what he called me? qualm perhaps,” LLL V, 2, 278 (a quibble between overcame or conquered, and befell, worked upon); cf. “in so high a style that no man living shall c. over it,” Ado V, 2, 7 (style and stile; surpass and get over). “nor came any of his bounties over me,” Tim. III, 2, 85 (were bestowed on me). “how he --s o'er us with our wilder days,” H5 I, 2, 267 (wakes us to sad remembrance); cf. “it --s o'er my memory,” Oth. IV, 1, 20.
5) To c. to sth. == a) to reach, to attain: “being c. to knowledge,” Meas. V, 153. “how came you to this?” Ado I, 3, 59 (== whence do you know this?). “let me c. to her,” Mids. III, 2, 328. “I cannot c. to Cressid but by Pandar,” Troil. I, 1, 98. “young men will do't, if they c. to't,” Hml. IV, 5, 60. he came unto himself (== he recovered his senses) Caes. I, 2, 264. -- b) to be brought to a state or condition: “to c. to growth,” Lucr. 1062. “to c. to death,” Wint. V, 2, 93. H6C III, 3, 187. “came early to his grave,” John II, 5. “to ill end,” III, 1, 94. “to ruin,” Cor. III, 2, 125. “to good,” Hml. I, 2, 158. Lr. III, 7, 100. “to bliss,” Oth. V, 2, 250. “to deadly use,” Lr. IV, 2, 36. “to the full,” Ant. II, 1, 11. “to words,” II, 6, 3. “to harvest,” II, 7, 26. “to composition,” Meas. I, 2, 1. “this we came not to,” Meas. I, 2, 1 “his fact came not to an undoubtful proof,” IV, 2, 142. his neck will c. to your waist (i. e. have a cord about it) III, 2, 42. “c. to such penury,” As I, 1, 42. “to the arbitrement of swords,” H5 IV, 1, 168. “to this change,” Tim. IV, 3, 65. “to what issue,” Hml. I, 4, 89. he's the second time c. to them (swaddling-clouts) II, 2, 402. I came to it (to be a grave-digger) V, 1, 155. “is it c. to this?” Ado I, 1, 199. H6A V, 4, 67. H6B II, 1, 38. Caes. IV, 3, 50. Lr. III, 4, 50. “what will this c. to?” Tim. I, 2, 197. To c. to it == to reach the age of puberty, to attain full growth: “grow till you c. unto it,” H4B III, 2, 270. “the other is not c. to it; you shall tell me another tale, when the other is c. to it,” Troil. I, 2, 90 (a quibble; cf. Hml. IV, 5, 60). -- c) to fall to: “the other half --s to the privy coffer of the state,” Merch. IV, 1, 354. Merch. IV, 1, 354 -- d) to begin to speak of: “c. me to what was done to her,” Meas. II, 1, 121. “now I c. to it,” V, 194. -- e) to amount: “I have purchased as many diseases under her roof as . . . c. to three thousand dolours,” Meas. I, 2, 47. “what --s the wool to?” Wint. IV, 3, 35. “a million of beating may c. to a great matter,” Wint. IV, 3, 35 “I would not be a young count in your way, for more than blushing --s to,” H8 II, 3, 42. “so much the rent of his land --s to,” Lr. I, 4, 148. Similarly: “to lack humanity so much as this fact --s to,” Cymb. III, 2, 17. “deserved so long a breeding as his white beard came to,” V, 3, 17.
Joined with adverbs: 1) to c. about (cf. above: “the wind is c. about,” Merch. II, 6, 64) == to be effected, to be brought to bear: “how a jest shall c. about,” Rom. I, 3, 45. “how these things came about,” Hml. V, 2, 391.
2) to c. forth (besides its original sense of going out, f. i. Caes. II, 1, 194) == to appear: “when --s your book forth?” Tim. I, 1, 26. “let the world see his nobleness well acted, which your death will never let c. forth,” Ant. V, 2, 46.
3) to c. in == a) to enter: Meas. III, 1, 45. Err. V, 40. H5 II, 1, 122 etc. “we came in with Richard Conqueror,” Shr. Ind. 1, 4. -- b) to come home: “you must c. in earlier,” Tw. I, 3, 4. Troil. IV, 2, 54. -- c) to appear, to arrive at a certain place in a critical moment: “had not the old man c. in,” Wint. IV, 4, 628. “whilst I was big in clamour came there in a man,” Lr. V, 3, 208. “Iago in the interim came in and satisfied him,” Oth. V, 2, 318. Especially to be combatant or bring assistance in a fight: “to c. in against me,” As I, 1, 131. “I would be loath to foil him, if he c. in,” As I, 1, 131 “I c. but in to try with him the strength of my youth,” I, 2, 181. “upon which better part our prayers c. in,” John III, 1, 293. “and then c. in the other,” H4A II, 4, 201. “stay till all c. in,” IV, 3, 29. “the more and less came in with cap and knee,” IV, 3, 29 “and --s not in, o'erruled by prophecies,” IV, 4, 18. “here came in strong rescue,” H6A IV, 6, 26. -- Hence d) to intervene: “let mine own judgment pattern out my death, and nothing c. in partial,” Meas. II, 1, 31. “who can c. in and say that I mean her?” As II, 7, 77. -- e) to be gained, to accrue: “if fairings c. thus plentifully in,” LLL V, 2, 2. “we may boldly spend upon the hope of what is to c. in,” H4A IV, 1, 55. “our credit --s not in like the commodity,” Per. IV, 2, 33. -- f) to be mentioned: “how came that widow in?” Tp. II, 1, 77. “that 'only' came well in,” Shr. II, 365. “it came in too suddenly,” Cymb. I, 4, 130. -- g) to make a pass in fencing: “I followed me close, came in foot and hand,” H4A II, 4, 241. “and c. you in and c. you in,” H4B III, 2, 302. -- h) to begin: “then --s in the sweet o' the year,” Wint. IV, 3, 3. “now --s in the sweetest morsel of the night,” H4B II, 4, 396. “now --s in the sweet o' the night,” V, 3, 52 (perhaps to be registered under e)). -- i) “his spirit is c. in,” John V, 2, 70 (== he repents).
4) to c. near == to touch to the quick: “I have heard herself c. thus near,” Tw. II, 5, 29. “you c. near me now,” H4A I, 2, 14. “am I c. near ye now?” Rom. I, 5, 22.
5) to c. off == a) to get off, to get away, to escape: “my chief care is to c. fairly off from the great debts,” Merch. I, 1, 128. “thou mayst in honour c. off again,” As I, 2, 31. “came you off with so little,” All's IV, 1, 42. “to c. halting off,” H4B II, 4, 54. “he's settled, not to c. off, in his displeasure,” H8 III, 2, 23. “if the dull Ajax c. safe off,” Troil. I, 3, 381. “aidless came off,” Cor. II, 2, 116. “if I c. off and leave her in such honour,” Cymb. I, 4, 164. “c. off,” II, 2, 33. -- b) to acquit one's self: “bravely came we off,” John V, 5, 4. H5 III, 6, 77. “we are c. off like Romans,” Cor. I, 6, 1. And similarly of things: “it came hardly off,” Gentl. II, 1, 116. “this --s off well; here's a wise officer,” Meas. II, 1, 57. “most incony vulgar wit! when it --s so smoothly off,” LLL IV, 1, 145. “this --s off well and excellent,” Tim. I, 1, 29. “this overdone, or c. tardy off,” Hml. III, 2, 28 (but cf. below). -- c) to come down with a sum, to pay: “they must c. off; I'll sauce them,” Wiv. IV, 3, 13.
6) to c. on == a) to advance, to approach: Meas. III, 1, 43. V, 400. All's IV, 3, 329. Shr. V, 2, 180. Mcb. I, 5, 9 etc. -- b) to accompany, to follow, to go with a person: “c. on, we'll visit Caliban,” Tp. I, 2, 307. “c. on; obey,” Tp. I, 2, 307 Tp. I, 2, 307 “c. on, Panthino,” Gentl. I, 3, 76. II, 5, 8. Meas. IV, 2, 57. V, 282. LLL I, 1, 312. V, 2, 136. Shr. I, 1, 150. H6C IV, 7, 87. Rom. I, 5, 127. Sometimes used as a phrase of salutation: “c. on, sir; give me your hand,” H4B III, 2, 1. “c. on, c. on, where is your boar-spear, man?” R3 III, 2, 74. -- c) like the simple come, used as an interjection implying an exhortation or rebuke: “c. on then; down and swear,” Tp. II, 2, 157. “c. on, let us sing,” III, 2, 129. “now, sir, c. on, what was done to Elbow's wife?” Meas. II, 1, 144. “c. on, sir knave, have done your foolishness,” Err. I, 2, 72. LLL I, 1, 59. Merch. III, 4, 57. Shr. V, 2, 133. Tw. IV, 1, 34. II, 3, 32. Wint. II, 1, 27. IV, 4, 161. H4B V, 4, 8. H6A II, 4, 55. Mcb. III, 2, 26. Hml. I, 5, 151. V, 2, 265. V, 2, 265 Lr. II, 2, 49. Oth. II, 1, 110. Oth. II, 1, 110 -- To c. upon == to c. on, Troil. IV, 3, 3.
7) to c. up == a) to arrive, H4A IV, 3, 20 etc. -- b) to become a fashion: “since gentlemen came up,” H6B IV, 2, 10. -- c) to c. up to == to approach near: “will not c. up to the truth,” Wint. II, 1, 193. -- d) marry c. up, a vulgar phrase of reproof: “are you so hot? marry c. up, I trow,” Rom. II, 5, 64. “marry, c. up, my dish of chastity,” Per. IV, 6, 159.
To c. home, used of an anchor that will not hold: “when you cast out, it still came home,” Wint. I, 2, 214.
To c. short == to fall short, not to reach: “how far a modern quill doth come too short,” Sonn. 83, 7. “her proportions came short of composition,” Meas. V, 220. Ado III, 5, 45. Hml. IV, 7, 91. cf. Short. Similarly: “if you c. slack of former services,” Lr. I, 3, 9. “this overdone, or c. tardy of,” Hml. III, 2, 28 (but see above).
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