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Company, subst., 1) the being or going together: “I would entreat thy c. to see the wonders of the world,” Gentl. I, 1, 5. “the other takes in hand no cause of c. of her drops' spilling,” Lucr. 1236. Gentl. II, 4, 40. IV, 1, 46. IV, 3, 25. IV, 3, 25 IV, 4, 18. V, 2, 36. Wiv. I, 1, 271. I, 4, 163. III, 3, 25. Meas. III, 1, 182. IV, 3, 144. IV, 3, 144 Err. II, 1, 87. V, 226. Ado I, 1, 84. Mids. III, 2, 434. Mids. III, 2, 434 Merch. I, 2, 125. IV, 2, 8 etc. In c. (opposed to alone) Err. V, 66. Rom. III, 5, 179. From c. == alone, H6A V, 5, 100. For c. == together, Shr. IV, 1, 180. “To bear c.:” Err. I, 1, 130. H6A II, 2, 53. H6C I, 3, 6. R3 II, 3, 47. H8 II, 2, 59 (cf. bear). “To keep c.” Tw. V, 99. “To keep a person c.:” Err. V, 398. Merch. III, 1, 16. As I, 2, 287. Tim. V, 1, 111. How lost you c.? (== how were you separated?) Oth. II, 1, 91. Plur. --ies: “thrust thyself into their --ies,” John IV, 2, 167. Hml. II, 2, 14.
2) converse, friendly intercourse: “they that fawned on him before use his c. no more,” Pilgr. 422. “her blind boy's c. I have forsworn,” Tp. IV, 90. Gentl. III, 1, 27. III, 2, 4. As II, 1, 52. “To keep c.” Mids. III, 1, 147. “To keep a p. c.” Merch. I, 1, 108. H4B V, 5, 63. “To keep c. with:” Wiv. III, 2, 73. LLL IV, 3, 179.
3) the person or persons with whom one is or lives together; companion or companions: “sad souls are slain in merry c.” Lucr. 1110. “to thee and thy c. I bid a hearty welcome,” Tp. V, 110. Tp. V, 110 “to seek new friends and stranger --ies,” Mids. I, 1, 219. I would have him see his c. (sc. Parolles) “anatomized,” All's IV, 3, 37. “his --ies unlettered,” H5 I, 1, 55. Gentl. I, 3, 43. Wiv. I, 1, 187. III, 2, 14. IV, 2, 35. LLL V, 2, 514. Mids. II, 1, 223. Merch. I, 1, 59. H4A II, 1, 51 etc. “grace and good c.!” Meas. III, 1, 44 (i. e. the company of good spirits, instead of evil ones).
4) an assemblage of persons: “the c. parts,” Gentl. IV, 2, 81. “forbear till this c. be past,” LLL I, 2, 131. is all our c. here? Mids. 1, 2, 1, 2 “honest c., I thank you all,” Shr. III, 2, 195. Gentl. IV, 4, 12. Wiv. III, 3, 251. Mids. V, 361. Shr. I, 1, 247. III, 2, 96.
Hence sometimes == people: “brings home his lord and other c.” Lucr. 1584. “forbear; here's c.” Wiv. II, 3, 17. “more c.! the fiend is strong within him,” Err. IV, 4, 110. “c.! stay,” LLL IV, 3, 77 (== there is somebody coming). “we shall be dogged with c.” Mids. I, 2, 106. here comes more c. (Viz Oliver), As IV, 3, 75. “what c. is this?” Shr. I, 1, 46. “but soft! c. is coming here,” IV, 5, 26. “to break a jest upon the c. you overtake,” IV, 5, 73. “search what --ies are near,” Cymb. IV, 2, 69. “no --ies abroad?” Cymb. IV, 2, 69
5) a subdivision of a regiment, under the command of a captain: All's IV, 3, 187. H4A IV, 2, 46. Caes. IV, 3, 140. “gentlemen of --ies,” H4A IV, 2, 27 (non-commissioned officers?). “I am a gentleman of a c.” H5 IV, 1, 39.
6) the crew of a ship: “the king and all our c. else being drowned,” Tp. II, 2, 179. “we have safely found our king and c.” V, 222.
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