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Cónjure (conjúre in Err. III, 1, 34. Rom. II, 1, 26. Hml. V, 1, 279. Oth. I, 3, 105. III, 3, 294), 1) to influence by magic, to engage by incantations; a) absolutely: “dost thou c. for wenches, that thou callest for such store?” Err. III, 1, 34. “if you would c. in her,” H5 V, 2, 319. “I'll c. too,” Rom. II, 1, 6. Caes. I, 2, 146. Troil. V, 2, 125. Per. IV, 6, 156.
b) trans.: “I would to God some scholar would c. her,” Ado II, 1, 264. H5 II, 1, 57. H6A I, 5, 5. Troil. II, 3, 6. Hml. V, 1, 279. Followed by an infinitive, to denote the effect: “all these spirits thy power hath --d to attend,” Tim. I, 1, 7. Lr. II, 1, 41. Followed by an adverb: “till she had laid it and --d it down,” Rom. II, 1, 26. “to c. up:” Mids. III, 2, 158. H5 V, 2, 316. H5 V, 2, 316 H6B V, 1, 199. R3 I, 2, 34. Caes. II, 1, 323. cf. “the habitation which your prophet --d the devil into,” Merch. I, 3, 35. “magic, which has my evils --d to remembrance,” Wint. V, 3, 40. “you c. from the breast of civil peace such bold hostility,” H4A IV, 3, 43. -- Conjured == charmed by incantations: “some dram --d to this effect,” Oth. I, 3, 105. -- Comically, to c. == to make one pay dear for conjuring: “I'll c. you, I'll fortune-tell you,” Wiv. IV, 2, 195.
2) to call on with solemnity, to obsecrate; a) absol.: “with letters --ing to that effect,” Hml. IV, 3, 66 (Qq congruing). -- b) trans.: “I do c. thee,” Gentl. II, 7, 2. Meas. V, 48. Err. IV, 4, 60. As Epil. Err. IV, 4, 60 John IV, 2, 269. Mcb. IV, 1, 50. Hml. II, 2, 294. Followed by an infin: “I c. thee to leave me,” Err. IV, 3, 68. Cor. V, 2, 81. “she --s him . . . that he makc retire,” Lucr. 568. “that thou declare,” Wint. I, 2, 400. “she should ever keep it,” Oth. III, 3, 294. The effect denoted by a preposition: he hath --d me beyond them (my occasions) Tim. III, 6, 13.
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