previous next
Country, 1) a tract of land, a region: “he's a justice of peace in his c.” Wiv. I, 1, 226. “have I sought every c. far and near,” H6A V, 4, 3. “I do dismiss you to your several --ies,” H6B IV, 9, 21. “here in this c.” H6C III, 1, 75. “skirr the c. round,” Mcb. V, 3, 35.
2) the rural parts of a territory: “the c., city, court,” As II, 1, 59. III, 2, 48. All's III, 2, 14. “in cities mutinies, in --ies discord, in palaces treason,” Lr. I, 2, 117. Adjectively: “in c. footing,” Tp. IV, 138. “a c. fire,” Wiv. V, 5, 256. “girl,” LLL I, 2, 122. “proverb,” Mids. III, 2, 458. “folks,” As V, 3, 25. “copulatives,” V, 4, 58. “manners,” John I, 156. “cocks,” H5 IV Chor. H5 IV Chor. “servant-maid,” R3 I, 3, 107. “lord,” H8 I, 3, 44. “base,” Cymb. V, 3, 20. “gentleman,” Per. II, 3, 33. Obscure passage: “I mean, my head upon your lap. Ay, my lord. Do you think I meant c. matters?” Hml. III, 2, 123 (thought by some to be an allusion to a certain French word of a similar sound).
3) the whole territory of a state: “king of this c.” Tp. IV, 243. V, 106. Meas. III, 2, 230. Err. III, 2, 117. Ado III, 2, 34. Merch. II, 8, 30. As III, 2, 126. Tw. I, 2, 21. R2 IV, 98. H6A V, 1, 62. R3 I, 3, 152. Troil. II, 2, 95. Caes. V, 3, 49 etc. Followed by of: “our c. of Greece,” Per. II, 1, 68. Followed by a name without of: “the c. Maine and Anjou,” H6A V, 3, 154. -- “My picked man of --ies,” John I, 193 (== traveller). “the rest of thy low --ies have made a shift to eat up thy holland,” H4B II, 2, 25. -- == the inhabitants of a territory: “all the c. cried hate upon him,” H4B IV, 1, 136. “how will the c. misthink the king,” H6C II, 5, 107.
4) the land of nativity: “bleed, bleed, poor c.” Mcb. IV, 3, 31. “in spite of nature, of years, of c., credit, every thing,” Oth. I, 3, 97. “forgive me, c. and sweet countrymen,” H6A III, 3, 81. “your own c.” As IV, 1, 35. “my c.” Wint. IV, 2, 5. H6A I, 2, 81. II, 3, 41. III, 3, 44. V, 1, 27. H6B I, 1, 206. II, 3, 12. H5 V, 2, 58. Troil. IV, 1, 68. Cor. I, 9, 17. Mcb. I, 3, 114. Ant. IV, 14, 80. Adjectively: “by all our c. rights in Rome maintained,” Lucr. 1838. “I know our c. disposition well,” Oth. III, 3, 201. “to match you with her c. forms,” Oth. III, 3, 201 “our c. mistresses,” Cymb. I, 4, 62.
Perhaps used as a trisyllable in Tw. I, 2, 21 and Cor. I, 9, 17 (cf. Henry).
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: