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Captain, 1) leader, commander in general: “c. of our fairy band,” Mids. III, 2, 110. “the c. of his horse,” All's IV, 3, 327. “being c. of the watch to-night,” H6A II, 1, 61. a wise stout c. (viz. the mayor of York) H6C IV, 7, 30. == leader of a troop of robbers: Gentl. IV, 1, 65. V, 3, 2. V, 3, 2 V, 3, 2
2) the commander of a ship: Meas. I, 2, 13. Tw. I, 2, 47. V, 57. V, 57 H6B IV, 1, 107.
3) leader of a company: All's II, 1, 38. II, 5, 34. IV, 1, 8. H4A IV, 2, 4. H4B II, 4, 149. H4B II, 4, 149 III, 2, 66. H6A II, 2, 59. V, 3, 128. R3 V, 3, 30. R3 V, 3, 30 R3 V, 3, 30 Cor. V, 2, 57. Hml. IV, 4, 1. V, 2, 406. Lr. V, 3, 26. Oth. III, 3, 59. Ant. III, 13, 184. Cymb. IV, 2, 344 etc.
4) chief commander: “his c. Christ,” R2 IV, 99. “great Mars, the c. of us all,” Troil. IV, 5, 198. “like soldiers, when their c. once doth yield,” Ven. 893. “affection is my c., and he leadeth,” Lucr. 271. Lucr. 271 “his --'s heart,” Ant. I, 1, 6. “who does in the wars more than his c. can, becomes his --'s c.” III, 1, 21. “thy grand c. Antony,” III, 1, 9. “the ass more c. than the lion,” Tim. III, 5, 49. cf. Meas. II, 2, 130. H6A III, 2, 71. III, 4, 16. IV, 1, 32. IV, 2, 3. IV, 4, 17. Cor. V, 2, 55. Tit. V, 3, 94. Ant. IV, 14, 90 etc. Used in the vocative: H6A V, 3, 97. Tim. I, 2, 74. III, 5, 6. Oth. I, 2, 53. Figuratively: “he is the courageous c. of complements,” Rom. II, 4, 20 (cf. king). Used of women: “a phoenix, c. and an enemy,” All's I, 1, 182 (i. e. a mistress of his heart). “where's c. Margaret?” H6C II, 6, 75. “our great --'s c.” Oth. II, 1, 74 (cf. Ant. III, 1, 21).
5) the general as the instrument and substitute of a higher power: “the figure of God's majesty, his c., steward,” R2 IV, 126. “O thou, whose c. I account myself,” R3 V, 3, 108.
6) in familiar language, a term of endearment, nearly == stripling, spark: “come, c., we must be neat,” Wint. I, 2, 122. “how now, c., what do you in this wise company?” Tim. II, 2, 76.
7) adjectively used, == predominant, overruling: “therefore are feasts so solemn and so rare, since, seldom coming, in the long year set, like stones of worth they thinly placed are, or c. jewels in the carcanet,” Sonn. 52, 8. “captive good attending c. ill,” 66, 12.
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